Product Review: Kerrits Coach’s Coat

Welcome to EN’s Product Review series! Who doesn’t love shopping, especially when the object of your search is new gear for yourself or your horse? As an enthusiast of all products equine, I LOVE trying out new gear. Please join me as I narrate my personal journey of trying out all of the products featured. While I will make no recommendations, I hope you have fun reading about my many adventures of trying new products, and that hearing about my personal experiences helps you on your own quest for new gear. Go Shopping.

The Coach's Coat features a row of three snaps that can be unfastened to allow a back gusset to expand and fit nicely over the saddle while riding. Photo by Lorraine Peachey. The Coach's Coat features a row of three snaps that can be unfastened to allow a back gusset to expand and fit nicely over the saddle while riding. Photo by Lorraine Peachey.

This time of the year, the weather is a wee bit unpredictable. While one day it’s rainy and blustery, the next day can be sunny and fairly temperate. Just last weekend, I enjoyed riding out in the sunny, almost 70-degree weather … in the middle of December.

In my home state of Pennsylvania, a nearly 70-degree day this time of the year is a very welcome, though uncommon occurrence. But the temperatures have been up and down of late. And they’ve been accompanied by a fair share of rainy days, too.

Keeping true to that statement, this week we’ve had lows in the 20s, with a couple of cold and rainy days thrown in for good measure, which meant that some planning went into picking out my wardrobe for spending time around the barn and in the saddle.

No one likes to be cold and wet while riding, least of all me. Staying dry is paramount in my mind, because I can’t stand feeling soggy when I’m trying to focus on having the best ride that I can. Since I’m not going to let a little thing like rain stand in the way of my riding time.

Which is why this season, I’ve been donning the Coach’s Coat from Kerrits as my outermost layer when heading out for a ride, especially on those cold, windy or rainy days. Layering is a must when it comes to surviving the cold season here in the northeast.

I’ve talked a lot about layering; while it is important to start with good quality base and mid layers that support performance, the outermost layer is important too. In my mind, the outer layer’s job should be to help shield against the elements of mother nature.

The long lines of the Coach's Coat are designed to help keep the rider dry both in and out of the saddle. Photo by Lorraine Peachey.

The long lines of the Coach’s Coat are designed to help keep the rider dry both in and out of the saddle. Photo by Lorraine Peachey.

And the Coach’s Coat is designed to do just that. The long lines of the coat are designed to help keep the rider dry both in and out of the saddle. It is constructed of Hydrotek fabric, which is both windproof and waterproof and is also critically seam sealed to protect against all weather conditions.

The Coach’s Coat has a two-way zipper that reaches from about my chin down to my hips. There is also a storm flap that is lined with quick close magnets the whole way down the front, which extend down past where the zipper ends. That is quite convenient!

Moving around to the back of the Coach’s Coat, there is also a split back gusset. There are a row of three snaps that can be unfastened to allow the back gusset to expand and fit nicely over the saddle while riding. The hood can also be stowed away while not in use.

And let’s not overlook the leg straps located inside the Coach’s Coat. The leg straps are black (which blends in against the lining) and have two snaps on each. They are easy to fasten around my leg using the snaps, which helps to hold it in place during my rides.

Not to be missed are the many storage options on the Coach’s Coat, which include a pocket on the left chest, as well as two generously sized hand warmer pockets, all of which have a zipper closure. Plus, there are also pit zips, which can help air circulation and support breathability.

I find the Coach’s Coat to fit and wear extremely well for me. When I pull it on to go riding, the bottom hem of the coat comes to the top of my tall boots (as a point of reference, I’m about 5’9″). And I usually fasten the leg straps before I set off outside when I know I’m going for a ride.

In the saddle. And out of the saddle. I stay dry and comfortable while wearing the Coach's Coat...which has made it one of my go to outer layers. Photo by Lorraine Peachey

In the saddle. And out of the saddle. I stay dry and comfortable while wearing the Coach’s Coat, which has made it one of my go to outer layers. Photo by Lorraine Peachey.

I wasn’t quite sure how the leg straps would feel, but I’m found them to not really be noticeable when fastened, even when I’m walking around. But where they really make a difference is in the saddle, when they do a great job holding the coat in place over my legs.

I do really like the combination of security and freedom that the quick close magnets down the front of the coat provide. While the two-way zipper has proven to be useful and sturdy, I feel like the magnet closures are an absolute can’t-do-without feature of the Coach’s Coat.

When I’m on the ground and trying to stay dry, the magnets easily find each other and pull the coat closed. But when I want to ride, they are just as easy to pull apart when I climb up into the saddle. Let’s say I’m a definite fan of the way the design is so easy to live and ride in!

The hand warmer pockets are generously sized enough to hold my large smartphone, keys, lip balm and more. And when I’m spending time out in the rain, I’m well protected from the elements by the waterproof and seam sealed “coat of armor” of the Coach’s Coat.

In the saddle. And out of the saddle. I stay dry and comfortable while wearing the Coach’s Coat, which has made it one of my go-to outer layers. Plus, I also enjoy the element of style that it adds to my wardrobe, whether I’m riding or wearing it away from the barn.

The Coach’s Coat from Kerrits is available in four colors, including Pepper Plaid, Bronze Plaid, Arctic Plaid and Flint Check, all of which coordinate with the rest of their collection. All four colors are available in sizes small through extra large and have a retail price of $199. You can find it here.

Go Stylish Protection from the Elements. Go Kerrits. Go Eventing.

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