This Week in Horse Health News Presented by Absorbine

Did you know that yawning can be a symptom of excitement, physical discomfort, or even fear in a horse? Photo by Andrew Lever. Did you know that yawning can be a symptom of excitement, physical discomfort, or even fear in a horse? Photo by Andrew Lever.

I’m a creature of habit, and it seems like the same can be said of my horses. It seems like every time I’m untacking after a ride, that my young gelding Rufus starts yawning. No sooner does the bit come out of his mount, does he start looking pretty darn relaxed. And then the yawns start.

I find Roo’s yawning to be pretty comical. In my mind, I always just write it off to the fact that he just finished worked hard during another one of his training sessions and has become relaxed after it’s conclusion. And in fact, yawning is a completely normal behavior for a horse after strenuous work or when the bit removed.

Equine yawning is an involuntary reflex behavior, which can occur when horse’s are stressed, drowsy or even hungry. Which means that it can also be a symptom of excitement, physical discomfort, or even fear in a horse. Check out this recent commentary article over at The Horse.com in order to learn more about what equine yawning means.

And then make sure to educate yourself on some of the other topics from This Week in Horse Health News, presented by Absorbine.

Why Hoof Bruises Happen: Riding on ground that has firm footing, or over rocky terrain can be the cause of ‘ouchy’ hooves. And even though your horse’s hooves seem like they should be able to be tough, they are more sensitive then you might think. While the hoof wall is designed to withstand concussion, the hoof can still be injured by too much impact, which can result in a stone bruise. [Equus Magazine]

Standing Wrap How-To: The knowledge of how to properly apply a standing wrap is an important skill for horse owners. Standing wraps are the a basic form of bandaging, and it is also important for horse owners to be able to know when they should use this form of bandaging, and why they should bandage their horse. [Practical Horseman]

Fall Feeding Tips: As the days grow shorter and the temperature drops, it is time to consider adjusting your horse’s nutrition program. Three important components to monitor are your horse’s water intake, the amount and type of forage they consume, as well as checking their body condition. [The Horse]

Blanket Saving Strategies: Are you oh so very ready to break out your horse’s brand spanking new winter blanket? But are you also cringing at the prospect of turning them out with their pasture mates in said brand new blanket? Check out these four tips to help try to make your horse’s brand new blanket make it to Spring. [Equus Magazine]

World Class Dressage Horse’s Heart Rediscovers it’s Rhythm: Through the use of a procedure called electrical cardioversion, an Olympic hopeful dressage horse that was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (commonly called an irregular heartbeat), has a reason to be hopeful again. Electrical cardioversion is a procedure that helps to “reset” the heart’s rhythm, through the use of an electrical current. [Horsetalk]

Comments