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Hannah Hubsch, Ashley Hays Claim CCI2* Wins at Fox River Valley Pony Club H.T.

CCI2*-L winners Hannah Hubsch and Bethel Park. Photo by John Borys Photography.

For almost five decades the Fox River Valley Pony Club, along with the support of an entire community, has helped organize and host the FRVPC Horse Trials. This year’s edition, held June 21-23 in Barrington Hills, Illinois, saw an exciting development: the return of the international-level competition in the form of CCI2*-L and CCI2*-S divisions.

“FRVPC recognizes how important international level competition was to the Area IV eventing community and decided to bring back the FEI divisions,” says Caroline Charette, an Area IV eventer who sits on FRVPC H.T.’s organizing and fundraising committees. “Instituting was a very large feat but the event was a huge success!”

The hardworking FRVPC H.T. team was joined this year by new course designers. Brody Robertson, whose resume includes includes WEG and the Longines World Cup Finals in addition to a number of events, designed the show jumping courses. Jay Hambly, FEI “I” cross country course designer and lead builder for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, created the cross country courses at all the levels. 

Heidi Crowell and Zydeco Nights in the CCI2*-L. Photo by John Borys Photography.

By all accounts the tracks were well received as challenging but educational for horses and riders alike, and a great deal of work was put into tending the footing this spring from fertilizing and seeding to aerovating. Peter Gray, dressage judge and president of the ground jury, remarked that the event continuously improves and noted the quality of this year’s courses. Jay reflected that he was happy with the way the weekend went: “I think [the courses] rode very well and the riders all made smart decisions and finished with better horses than they started with.”

Leah Lang-Gluscic Mightylee in the CCI2*-L. Photo by John Borys Photography.

The CCI2*-L was won by Hannah Hubsch and Bethel Park, her own 13-year-old Thoroughbred gelding (E Dubai x Bosanquet, by Pleasant Colony). The pair was second after dressage on a score of 31.8 then jumped into the lead with double-clear jumping rounds. The pair has a well-established track record of making short work of Intermediate horse trials but FRVPC H.T. marked their first FEI outing together.

“Honestly it was an incredible weekend,” Hannah said. “‘Spiderman’ had his game face on in every phase and he gave me all the confidence in the world that we were going to have a great weekend! I was just going to be happy to finish our first FEI event together, let alone a win it! That was icing on the cake. I love this horse so much, he’s so honest and I couldn’t ask for a better partner in this sport. I can’t thank enough all my family, friends and fiancé that support us so much. And Fox River Valley put on a hell of a fun event!”

The CCI2*-S was won by the experienced team of Ashley Hays and Call it Courage, her own 11-year-old Holsteiner gelding (Casall x Karabik I, by Lennon). The pair led the 11-strong division from wire to wire, adding one rail to their dressage score of 29.5 for the win.

Lynnea Woody and Prince Eric in the CCI2*-L. Photo by John Borys Photography.

The event hosted a Pony Club Rally in conjunction with the horse trials this year. Alongside the FEI divisions, the Pony Clubbers had to present their horses and ponies to the ground jury at the beginning of the competition as well as on the final morning.

Congrats to all the winners!

CCI 2 Star Long: Hannah Hubsch & Bethel Park (31.8)
CCI 2 Star Short: Ashley Hays & Call it Courage (33.5)
Open Preliminary: Elly Bates & Bold Move (35.1)
Preliminary Rider: Olivia Coolidge & Bold Impression (31.5)
Jr. Training Rider: Louisa Ward & Wonder Girl (32.6)
Open Training: Elle Choate & Paddrick (29.8)
Sr. Training Rider-A: Chantil Ruud & L’Alezane (24.8)
Sr. Training Rider-B: Kailey DeMeyer & Ninjutsu (37.6)
Jr. Novice Rider-A: Kaylianna McMorris & Clifton Peekachu (27.3)
Jr. Novice Rider-B: Jessica Pollesch & Lambeau Gold (35.7)
Jr. Novice Rider-C: Maia Ramberg & CMF Cougar Roo (22.9)
Novice Horse: Kristen Rozycki & Vandalia (25.0)
Open Novice: Caitlyn Ruud & Colono de la Galerna (20.5)
Sr. Novice Rider-A: Katie Clapp & Lulu (31.0)
Sr. Novice Rider-B: Casey Vanecek & Over and Out (25.5)
Jr. Beginner Novice Rider-A: Lily Hamilton & Maverick (39.8)
Jr. Beginner Novice Rider-B: Brooke Krueger & Lila (36.5)
Open Beginner Novice: Emily Grant & It’s Otto (28.6)
Sr. Beginner Novice Rider-A: Katie Sisk & Miss Eminence (20.0)
Sr. Beginner Novice Rider-B: Amy Fowler & Ginnetts Manricko (24.0)
Starter: Kim Kind-Bauer & Chasin’ Mason (29.0)

View complete results here.

Junior Novice A division winners Kaylianna McMorris and Clifton Peekachu. Photo by John Borys Photography.

USEA CEO Rob Burk is one of eventing’s most beloved volunteers and everyone was excited to see him out and about at FRVPC H.T. lending a helping hand. “This is a wonderful event and it is obvious how much the volunteers and organizers love this event,” Rob said. “The mix of the Pony Club rally and he horse trials make it even more special. I will definitely be back to visit!”

A few snapshots from the event courtesy of Rob and FRVPC:

The future looks bright for this special event.

“In 2020 FRVPC Horse Trials will celebrate its 50th year!” says Caroline of the organizing committee. “In addition to supporting the sport of eventing in the midwest and the educational mission of the FRVPC, the running of the FRVPC H.T. also plays a critical role in the preservation of open space in the unique equestrian area of Barrington Hills. It is a truly special event that unites an entire community and a legacy we hope will continue on for years to come.”

Photo courtesy of Fox River Valley Pony Club H.T.

Visit FRVPCHorseTrials.org to find out how you can help support the horse trials and ensure its sustainability for years to come.

[Fox River Valley Horse Trials Brings FEI Eventing Back to Area IV]

Weekend Winners: Kent School, Essex, Surefire, Stable View, FRVPC, Shepherd Ranch, Midsouth, Abbe Ranch

The U.S. Pony Clubs, Inc., has expanded its horizons over the years in the spirit of inclusiveness, but the discipline of eventing will always be at the heart of this great organization. Just as Pony Club strives to help create well-rounded horsemen and horsewomen, eventing is the ultimate test of well-rounded training.

Summer is high season for rallies, and this weekend saw Pony Club action from coast to coast: Santa Ynez Valley Pony Club’s Shepherd Ranch H.T. in California, Fox River Valley Pony Club H.T. in Illinois, and Midsouth Pony Club H.T. in Kentucky. The importance of these events can’t be understated; from event management and hosting to horse management and competing as a team, these formative experiences are the building blocks for a lifetime of positive and passionate involvement in our sport. Learn more about USPC here, and get involved in your local Pony Club as a participant, volunteer, coach or parent — the rewards will just keep coming.

Lots of low-low finishing scores out there this weekend! The lowest of them all belonged to Kalie Beckers and Madoc Mari, who scored a jaw-dropping 15.3 to win Open Beginner Novice at Midsouth. Honorable mentions to Ludger Thole and Rudy, who scored a 15.8 in Open Beginner Novice at Shepherd Ranch; Allison Springer and Fanta, who scored a 16.9 in Open Training at Surefire; and Martin Douzant and Johnny Walker, who scored a 17.8 in Open Beginner Novice also at Surefire.

And now, the rest of your weekend winners!

Fox River Valley Pony Club H.T. [Final Scores]
CCI 2 Star Long: Hannah Hubsch & Bethel Park (31.8)
CCI 2 Star Short: Ashley Hays & Call it Courage (33.5)
Open Preliminary: Elly Bates & Bold Move (35.1)
Preliminary Rider: Olivia Coolidge & Bold Impression (31.5)
Jr. Training Rider: Louisa Ward & Wonder Girl (32.6)
Open Training: Elle Choate & Paddrick (29.8)
Sr. Training Rider-A: Chantil Ruud & L’Alezane (24.8)
Sr. Training Rider-B: Kailey DeMeyer & Ninjutsu (37.6)
Jr. Novice Rider-A: Kaylianna McMorris & Clifton Peekachu (27.3)
Jr. Novice Rider-B: Jessica Pollesch & Lambeau Gold (35.7)
Jr. Novice Rider-C: Maia Ramberg & CMF Cougar Roo (22.9)
Novice Horse: Kristen Rozycki & Vandalia (25.0)
Open Novice: Caitlyn Ruud & Colono de la Galerna (20.5)
Sr. Novice Rider-A: Katie Clapp & Lulu (31.0)
Sr. Novice Rider-B: Casey Vanecek & Over and Out (25.5)
Jr. Beginner Novice Rider-A: Lily Hamilton & Maverick (39.8)
Jr. Beginner Novice Rider-B: Brooke Krueger & Lila (36.5)
Open Beginner Novice: Emily Grant & It’s Otto (28.6)
Sr. Beginner Novice Rider-A: Katie Sisk & Miss Eminence (20.0)
Sr. Beginner Novice Rider-B: Amy Fowler & Ginnetts Manricko (24.0)
Starter: Kim Kind-Bauer & Chasin’ Mason (29.0)

Shepherd Ranch SYVPC H.T. [Final Scores]
Open Preliminary: Maddy Mazzola & So Cool (31.2)
Jr Training Rider: Savannah Carter & Ballustree Dun Believable (34.6)
Open Training: Lauren Billys & Twilight 54 (23.8)
Sr Training Rider: Jessica DiCostanzo & Cocoa Z (25.4)
Jr Novice Rider: Christianna Altamura & Monkey Business (27.9)
Open Novice Final Scores Erin Kellerhouse & Reverie GWF (26.7)
Sr Novice Rider: Bronte Smith & Charlotte (21.7)
Jr Beginner Novice Rider A: Sarah Bonfield & Indigo (33.0)
Jr Beginner Novice Rider B Final Scores Sarah Bonfield Apollo (29.0)
Open Beginner Novice: Ludger Thole & Rudy (15.8)
Sr Beginner Novice Rider: Anita Parra & Sterling (30.5)
Open Introductory A: Joan Hankin & On Cloud Nine (33.3)
Open Introductory B: Ryann Bodman & Mohican (30.6)

Midsouth Pony Club H.T. [Final Scores]
Open Intermediate/Preliminary: Megan Edwards & Loughnatousa Reiner (36.2)
Open Preliminary, Div. 1: Madeline O’Brien & Casarino (30.7)
Open Preliminary, Div. 2: Maria Moraniec & Lady Business (28.1)
Open Training: Lindsey Howland & Copenhaegen (34.2)
Training Horse: Jennifer Coleman & SS Willow (22.9)
Training Rider, Div. 1: Jocelyn Howland & Niner’s Blaze (34.8)
Training Rider, Div. 2: Kiersten Miller & Mama Mia (29.2)
Training Rider, Div. 3: Emma Hilt & The Blues Man (31.4)
Novice Horse: Megan Edwards & Kip To the Beat (25.0)
Novice Rider, Div. 1: Sarah Beth Slaughter & In The Spotlight (25.2)
Novice Rider, Div. 2: Claire Gamlin & Alohomora (26.4)
Novice Rider, Div. 3: Corey Evans & Prairie Rose (27.4)
Novice Rider, Div. 4: Adalee Ladwig & Diego (32.4)
Open Novice, Div. 1: Erin Pullen & Koko Chanel (22.6)
Open Novice, Div. 2: Alexandra Baugh & Dogano De L’oiseliere (28.1)
Beginner Novice Rider, Div. 1: Keely Bechtol & Orion (27.0)
Beginner Novice Rider, Div. 2: Harper Holland & Ima Rain Storm (22.0)
Beginner Novice Rider, Div. 3: Marin Swyers & Bibbidy Bobbidy Boo (32.0)
Beginner Novice, Horse: Corinna Garcia & P.H. Lev Livet (30.8)
Open Beginner Novice: Kalie Beckers & Madoc Mari (15.3)
Open Starter, Div. 1: Mimi Kelly & Apache Lynx (40.3)
Open Starter, Div. 2: Emma Butler & Lillith (31.5)

Kent School Spring H.T. [Final Scores]
Modified: Elisabeth Libby & Irish Silk (31.1)
Training: Darrah Alexander & Shirsheen Du Carel (31.4)
Novice-A: Jessica Katz & Fernhill Sylvus (32.9)
Novice-B: Willa Brown & Carugo (25.5)
Novice – Jr/YR: Teagan Lapuk & My Blue Heaven (26.4)
Beginner Novice-A: Emily Staley & Carnivale King (32.8)
Beginner Novice-B: Jaime Kalisz & Major Tom (26.7)
Beginner Novice-C: Kimberly Coleman & Beyond Repute (36.7)
Beginner Novice – Jr/YR-A: Rose Battista & Maui Waui (38.3)

MARS EQUESTRIAN Essex H.T. [Final Scores]
Advanced: William Coleman & Obos O’Reilly (42.1)
Open Preliminary: Jennifer Brannigan & FE Connory (23.3)
Preliminary “Essex”: Boyd Martin & Luke 140 (30.1)
Preliminary Rider: Megan Compton & Coco Mademoiselle (30.8)
Open Training-A: Caroline Martin & Redfield Spy (24.1)
Open Training-B: Lillian Heard & Chilly (29.1)
Training Rider-A: Michelle Bull & Eloise (37.9)
Training Rider-B: Abigail Mazzatta & Woodstock’s Little Nev (27.9)
Novice Rider-A: Shannon Schmidt & Capeach (28.8)
Novice Rider-B: Jennifer Clapp & Sea Change (26.7)
Novice Rider-C: Erin Hurley & Merlot (34.8)
Open Novice-A: Arielle Aharoni & Furst Queen (26.2)
Open Novice-B: Jennifer Brannigan & FE Celestino (26.4)
Beginner Novice Rider-A: Diane Edgerly & Nicole (26.0)
Beginner Novice Rider-B: Katie Label & Mr. Big Blue Eyes (23.0)
Beginner Novice Rider-C: Paisley Narra & Huckleberry (30.5)
Open Beginner Novice: Brittany Yard & Believe it or Not (28.5)

Surefire Farm H.T. [Final Scores]
4 yo Young Event Horse: Kimmy Cecere & Landmark’s ROC Steady
5 yo Young Event Horse: Jill Thomas & Bon Vivant
Open Intermediate: Andi Lawrence & Cooley Northern Mist (43.0)
Open Preliminary: Allison Springer & Crystal Crescent Moon (28.4)
Preliminary Rider: Benjamin Noonan & Keep Kitty (22.8)
Junior Open Training: Benjamin Noonan & Bojangles (25.0)
Open Training-A: Allison Springer & Fanta (16.9)
Open Training-B: Kendyl Tracy & Bobbie Burns (27.8)
Open Training-C: Allison Springer & Lickity Split (24.3)
Training Rider: Carly Eddahri & La Perle Noire (31.9)
Junior Open Novice: Will Rowland & Chica Ye Ye (33.1)
Novice Rider: Kathleen Cannon & Pacific Storm (22.1)
Open Novice-A: Timothy Bourke & Flying Quality (27.1)
Open Novice-B: Timothy Bourke & Cooley Courageous (26.4)
Beginner Novice Rider: Karen Eichert & Trumbull (33.1)
Junior Beginner Novice: Samantha Homeyer & Dora the Explorer (26.7)
Open Beginner Novice-A: Elizabeth Olmstead & Waterline (30.3)
Open Beginner Novice-B: Martin Douzant & Johnny Walker (17.8)

Stable View Summer H.T. [Final Scores]
Junior Preliminary Rider: Claire Howard & Euro Star (33.5)
Open Preliminary: Kristin Schmolze & Foxdale’s Celtic Charm (31.0)
Junior Training Rider: Darcy Drury & Fernhill Bijzonder (23.6)
Open Training: Shannon Riley & Laissez Aller (33.8)
Training Rider: Rebecca Puglisi & Rosie’s Little Miss Liberty (30.5)
Junior Novice Rider: Finley Habernicht & Aleta NSF (26.2)
Novice Rider-A: Ruth Ahearne & Justified (28.1)
Novice Rider-B: Katelyn Younce & Mystic Love Song (29.7)
Open Novice: Hayden Jones & Reignman (37.1)
Beginner Novice Rider: Beth Allen & Remastered (29.5)
Junior Beginner Novice Rider: Gabby Chevalier & Little Joe (28.5)
Open Beginner Novice: Nobie Cannon & Make MY Day (27.3)

Abbe Ranch H.T. [Final Scores]
Training: Madeline Backus & Reflektion’s Rio (24.5)
NoviceA: Emily Ashburn & Hall of Magic (28.6)
NoviceB: Angelika Beutel & O’Sullivan (30.2)
BegNoviceA: Heather McWilliams & Southern Soiree (25.5)
BegNoviceB: Madeline Backus & New Song’s Freedom (26.3)
BegNoviceC: Hope Price & Sequoia (26.5)
IntroA: Polly Lychee & Macgyver (35.2)
IntroB: Loree Magnan & Wintano (39.6)

Congrats to all. Go Pony Club, and Go Eventing!

Best of HN: Weekend Wellness: Equine Chiropractic Work

Our sister site Horse Nation takes us back to 2014 when they welcomed Colleen Hofstetter to outline the benefits of chiropractic work for your horse.

Colleen Hofstetter outlines the benefits of this increasingly popular alternative medicine practice. From Colleen:

I’m dreaming: My horse is giving me his perspective on things. Seems he is pretty happy; he likes his digs and his turnout. Then he says to me:

Him: “But hey – what about that C-3 thing – are you ever going to get that taken care of?”

Me: “Ummmmm, C-3… not really sure what you are talking about?”

Him: “C-3! In my neck! You’re the one that thinks it’s so important for me to be flexing my neck — how ‘bout getting that looked at. And while you’re at it, thanks for the Cosequin and those pesky hock injections, but honestly, look up around my pelvis. Haven’t you ever watched me walk from behind? Tell me you haven’t noticed how my right side seems to move a little bit better? Dang, girl… I’ve been trying to let you know about a few things!!!”

In my dream world I now have a huffy, toe tapping horse, making me feel quite guilty about my poor observation skills.

Me: “Weeellllll… I did haul you to that university clinic and paid quite a bit of money for all those x-rays and scans. Remember, you stayed overnight in that special stall? We spent a lot of time there and, you heard the vet — keep you in work, get your muscles balanced, and….”

Him: “Yes, yes. I heard all that and I heard you crying the whole way home — saying something about your credit card being on fire and no real answers. I believe your saving grace on the whole trip is that you found out what wasn’t wrong, but how about we try that guy that came to see Sam down the aisle way? What could it hurt? I think Sam is walking much better and he is not as cranky as he used to be.”

Me: “Well, if you think it will help….”

I slowly wake and immediately start to wonder if my subconscious is trying to tell me something.

Over my first cup of coffee I begin to text some friends: “Anyone know of a good equine chiropractor?”

As we all strive to get the best results from our training, or simply want our horses to feel great, we continue to investigate more avenues to good health and optimal performance. It is not uncommon for owners to utilize numerous methods to ensure their horse’s health, including “alternative” medicine such as chiropractic techniques. As with other supports one must consider two important questions: What is the goal and who is performing the procedure?

Chiropractic techniques were developed over 100 years ago and have increasingly become more a part of mainstream medicine. Animal chiropractic was brought to the forefront by veterinarian Dr. Sharon Willowby, DVM. After experiencing chiropractic relief from her own spinal injuries related to her large animal practice, Dr. Willowby sold her veterinary practice and enrolled in Palmer College of Chiropractic. She graduated in 1985 as the first Dr of Chiropractic (DC)/DVM and planned to investigate the possibility of using chiropractic adjustment to help equine patients. To further this goal Dr. Willowby began to develop a curriculum to teach human chiropractors and other veterinarians how to adjust the misalignments of the equine and canine spine.

In June of 1989 she founded the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association (AVCA). A curriculum was developed by vets and chiropractors working in conjunction with each other; a core component of the curriculum is that vets and chiropractors teach each other the skills necessary to properly address the skeletal needs of the animal spine — each profession having its own skill sets from which they benefit. The AVCA is a professional membership/certification program in animal chiropractic. It is the primary national certification organization for this field in North America.

Certification as an animal chiropractor is awarded to human chiropractors or veterinarians after completing an 8-week, 210-hour certification program, with continuing education required. Hence, only licensed human chiropractors and veterinarians can earn recognized credentials as an equine chiropractic practitioner. Additionally, the Animal Chiropractic Certification Commission (ACCC) is the de facto certifying body for veterinary chiropractic, and all accredited programs must meet the requirements of curriculum, examination, and continuing education. The number of veterinary colleges offering instruction in alternative medicine is limited, but increasing. Click here to obtain a list of AVCA certified equine chiropractors.

There are other lay persons who have “hung out their shingle” but have not received the intensive training as those certified by the AVCA and are not considered an animal chiropractor in the eyes of states’ Departments of Agriculture, the department that regulates many activities related to horses including farriers, dentists, and veterinarians. Also, there are specific regulations that vary from state to state regarding who may “work on a horse.” There is some wiggle room in the state regulations which loosely translates into having a veterinarian “in the loop” — has the horse been seen by a vet before contacting an equine chiropractor? In some states a written referral from a vet is needed before chiropractic work is completed and only a licensed equine chiropractor can complete the procedures.

Most equine chiropractors will first ask if a horse has been seen by a vet to rule out trauma injuries such as fractures or other underlying medical conditions. The other factor related to licensed equine chiropractor vs. lay-person is the insurance question. Unfortunately, accidents do occur and if any practitioner causes permanent injury it is very difficult to seek compensation; double that headache if a practitioner is not considered legitimate in the eyes of the almighty insurance industry.

Chiropractic is defined as the “location, analysis, and correction of vertebral subluxation complexes as related to the treatment and prevention of biomechanical dysfunction of the skeleton, especially the spine, and its effect on the entire nervous system.” Chiropractic examinations tend to focus on the whole horse, specifically the spine and the nervous system, as compared to trying to identify a singular point of dysfunction. The spinal column is seen as the primary framework that helps the body to function without aches and pains. Thus, a misaligned spinal column may be responsible for a lack of flexibility of the neck and back as well as pinched nerves and painful spasms.

Vertebrae are joined together to foster movement. Improper alignment — subluxation — inhibits neuron processing which leads to interference in joints and other structures. This leads to stiffness, pain, and other problems seen in equine locomotion. When an equine chiropractor identifies a subluxation, their goal is to correct the misalignment through adjustment — a quick short thrust along the plane of the joint. A thorough chiropractic exam also includes assessing the limb joints and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ).

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Dr. Dave Smolensky, DC, checking out a few equine patients

Even though a certain speed of thrust is used to ensure that the horse’s muscles do not have time to contract and so restrict movement, it is the light touch that really counts. Human and equine chiropractor Dr. Dave Smolensky of Mars, Pa., explains that human finger tips have thousands of nerve endings. He further states that the lighter you palpate the more you feel — if you press hard you desensitize your finger tips: “The light touch comes with practice, practice, practice.”

Dr. Smolensky says that the job of the chiropractor is to locate the vertebrate that is out of alignment, adjust it to release the fixation and allow the body to make the correction. In doing so, this correction may then have an effect on numerous parts of the body and allows the body to heal itself. When asked what some common sources of subluxations are, Dr. Smolensky named several conditions frequented by our horses:

“Running in the pasture and slipping — the pelvis rotates; trailering and there are sudden stops or turns while a horse’s head is tied — the head snaps back or there is a sudden shift in body weight; falling while jumping effects the horse’s head and neck. Each riding discipline also has its problems – hunter/jumpers tend to have more hind end problems while western horses have problems up front. Other problems can be related to the sternum. Horses do not have a clavicle so the sternum can move. Ribs get misaligned. Also horses that crib could have a misaligned poll and they crib to relieve the pressure. Horses that really grind their back into the ground when rolling – they are trying to fix something themselves. You can tell a lot from the behavior of your horse, which means owners have to take the time to observe what their horse is doing in situations other than when riding.”

Good advice for all horse owners! Dr. Smolensky additionally stated that horses can also experience subluxations from micro trauma – the cumulative effect of daily training, or, conversely, being confined to a stall. Horses develop repetitive habits. Joints sustain damage from daily training, and while “motion is life to a joint,” if neurons from the spine are not transmitting information correctly, or not at all, the joint will not function properly, which will show up in abnormal movements in and out of the show ring.

If you want to investigate the possible need for chiropractic work, here is a video that illustrates what to look for when observing your horse:

Some horses need an occasional adjustment, some more often. Costs vary: $75 to $150 a visit. Access to a certified chiropractor varies. A quick perusal of the list of certified chiropractors shows a heavier cluster on the east coast as compared to other parts of the country. But as equine chiropractic methods become more common, additional human chiropractors may see the benefit of expanding their practice to include four legged patients as well as two legged ones. AND, we all know that we would gladly pass up our own adjustments in favor of having our horses done if we think it is going to help resolve a problem. Go figure!

Go Riding!

Another Weekend, Another Event at a Castle: A Preview of ERM Leg 3 at Arville

It’s not on Zillow — we checked. Photo courtesy of ERM.

The 2019 Event Rider Masters series is full speed ahead, and this weekend we land in Belgium for Leg 3 at the stately Arville Castle. The action takes place amidst the family estate of Guillaume de Liedekerke, a proper fancy backdrop for some of the proper fanciest event horses in the land. (Note to American eventing: We need more castles.) Twenty combinations representing seven different nations will tackle Rüdiger Schwarz’s challenging cross country course for a piece of the £50,000 prize pot and the chance to sit atop the ERM throne.

Leg 3’s star-studded crop of riders includes two ERM series champions, six leg winners, four five-star winners and last year’s Arville victor. The rundown:

Photo courtesy of ERM.

Australia: Chris Burton, the 2018 ERM series champion and last year’s Arville victor, is just 2 points off the top of the series rankings following Leg 2. He’ll be looking to retain the Arville title this weekend with Quality Purdey. Perennial favorites Bill Levett and Shannondale Titan, who finished third last year at Arville, will return in search of another podium placing for Australia.

France: Gireg le Coz brings forward Aisprit de la Loge, who is new to the level but shows promise having placed 6th in the CCI3*-S at Saumur earlier this year.

Germany: Dirk Schrade is entered with Bettina Hoy’s very competitive five-star partner Designer 10, while Niklas Bschorer will ride Lord Shostakovich.

Photo courtesy of ERM.

Great Britain: Laura Collett currently tops the rankings alongside Michael Jung and will look to pick up valuable series points at Arville with Dacapo. With one ERM leg win already this season at Chatsworth, Laura also has strong Arville form, having finished second last year with London 52. In addition to Laura, Great Britain brings forth a strong contingent including 2017 ERM series champion Gemma Tattersall, who will ride her Chatsworth 2017 winner Quicklook V. Blenheim 2017 winner Izzy Taylor comes forward with Fonbherna Lancer for the horse’s CCI4*-S debut. Team GB’s quest for the Arville podium is further strengthened by Wiesbaden 2017 winners Sarah “Cutty” Cohen and Treason; Jardy 2018 victor Alex Bragg with Alcatraz; and Nicola Wilson and Bulana, who won individual bronze at the 2017 European Championships. Tom Jackson also brings forward an exciting entry in Capels Hollow Drift, who finished second in the 7-year-old World Championships at Le Lion d’Angers last year. Look out also for 3* European Champion Franky Reid-Warrilow with My Squire de Reve, Nicholas Lucey with Kroon Leader, and Kirsty Johnston with WTTL Opposition Sky Law.

Photo courtesy of ERM.

Italy: Vittoria Panizzon will look to secure Italy’s first podium finish with her brilliant mare Borough Pennyz. She is joined by national teammate Pietro Sandei and Rubis de Prere.

The Netherlands: Reigning Dutch champion Tim Lips brings forward Eclips for the horse’s second ERM outing of 2019.

Photo courtesy of ERM.

New Zealand: All eyes will be on New Zealand power couple Tim and Jonelle Price, who are bringing two Luhmühlen CCI5*-L winners in Wesko and Faerie Dianimo, respectively. Tim is also in red-hot form coming off the back of a Luhmühlen win with Ascona M, a mare he competed in the ERM previously for 10th at Barbury 2018 and second at Blenheim Palace 2017. Both Tim and Jonelle are still hunting for their first ERM leg win.

Who will top the podium for Leg 3? Watch live and for free on www.eventridermasters.tv on Saturday, June 22nd and Sunday, June 23rd.

The full starting list with times is available here. Watch a video of the draw here. Dressage takes place Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to noon CEST (2:30 to 6 a.m. EST), to be followed by show jumping at 4:45 p.m. CEST (10:45 a.m. EST). Cross country follows on Sunday at 1 p.m. CEST (7 a.m. EST).

Go Eventing.

Arville Castle: ERM Website, Event WebsiteStart Times, Course Walk, Live ScoresLive Stream

[THE EVENT RIDER MASTERS RETURNS TO ARVILLE CASTLE FOR LEG 3]

Sara Sellmer and PDQ Leigh Leap Up the Leaderboard to Aspen Farms CCI3*-S Win

1st place CCI3*-S: Sara Sellmer and PDQ Leigh (Kamloops B.C.) Photo by Aaron Sonego.

Aspen Farms H.T. took place last weekend in Yelm, Washington, against a backdrop of tall pines, sapphire blue skies and vistas of a snow-covered Mount Ranier. The event is a no-miss for Area VII eventers, and the FEI divisions in particular drew a good-sized starter list: the CCI3*-S had 22 entries and the CCI2*-S had 23. It was a dynamic competition, with the winners of both jumping their way up the scoreboard from start to finish.

In the CCI3*-S, Sara Sellmer and PDQ Leigh rose from eighth after dressage to fifth after show jumping, then posted a cross country double clear to secure the top spot. They won on a final score of 32.7, ahead of second-placed Leah Breakey with Master Class on 34.7 and third-placed Samantha Pritchard with King’s Landing on 35.3.

CCI3*-S top three, with thanks to Aaron Sonego for the great photos! 

For Sara, of Kamloops, British Columbia, Aspen Farms H.T. marked the one-year anniversary of her relationship with the 9-year-old Hanoverian gelding (Quite Easy x Ennie, by Escudo I).

“I acquired the ride on PDQ Leigh at Aspen last year,” she says. “He is owned by Jil Walton, and her and her team produced him to Prelim then I got the ride on him. He is by the stallion Quite Easy, and he is! He attaches to his person, and I am lucky to be that person now.”

Sara and “Q” won the Advanced division at The Spring Event at Woodside in Woodside, California last month and had top 10 CCI3*-S placings at Galway Downs and Fresno Park this spring.

1st place CCI3*-S: Sara Sellmer and PDQ Leigh (Kamloops B.C.) Photo by Aaron Sonego.

“The weekend went really well,” Sara says of Aspen. “His dressage test was not what I was hoping only because we lost the marks in the canter because he was showing off his great flying changes! The trot work was super. He produced a double clear showjumping round which we have been working on. His cross country was stellar, fast and confident.”

“We now have our sights set on the CCI4*-S at Rebecca Farm,” says Sara, who last contested the level in 2016 with TF Kriesler. “It feel amazing to be back at the top of the sport with such a super partner and fantastic support team in Jil and her group.”

1st place CCI2*-S: Kayla Dumler and Faramir (Enumclaw, WA). Photo by Aaron Sonego.

The Aspen Farms CCI2*-S was bested by Kayla Dumler and Faramir, a 9-year-old Thoroughbred gelding (Capitalimprovement x Princess Malaga, by Zuppardo’s Prince) owned by the rider. The pair completed their first CCI2*-S together at Galway Downs in March and have had top placings in Prelim horse trials.

The pair jumped from 9th after dressage into 5th and finally 1st, finishing on their dressage score of 32.7. The jumping phases proved influential to the standings: the top three finishers all posted double-clears. Second place went to Whitney Shapiro and Eridani on a score of 35.6; 3rd went to Elizabeth Linde and Pie and Ice Cream on a score of 41.7.

CCI2*-S top three:

The Open Preliminary A division was won by Mikayla Hoffman and Eli on a score of 31.3; Open Preliminary B was won by Madison Langerak and Normandy’s Kivalo on a score of 24.1.

Open Prelim A top three: 

View complete results for Aspen Farms H.T. here.

CCI3*-S Final Top 10: 

CCI2*-S Final Top 10: 

Aspen Farm Horse Trial Division Winners: 
Open Intermediate: Stephanie Goodman & Drs Resolute (32.5)
Open Preliminary A: Mikayla Hoffman & Eli (31.3)
Open Preliminary B: Madison Langerak & Normandy’s Kivalo (24.1)
Jr. Training: Madelyn Myers & Bare Necessities (34.5)
Open Training: Marc Grandia & Rubel (27.2)
Training Horse: David Adamo & Solaguayre California (26.4)
Training Rider: Bobbie Smith-Ede & Winston (28.8)
Jr. Novice: Lilly Linder & Mia San Mia (23.3)
Novice Amateur: Tracy Stein & Apollo (29.2)
Novice Horse: Jennifer Dunzelman & Hardscrabble Salem (30.2)
Novice Rider: Piper Newman & Ferngully (30.0)
Beginner Novice Horse: Jordan Linstedt & Lovely Lola (25.0)
Beginner Novice Rider: Karen King & Deadwood Sage (41.5)
Jr. Beginner Novice: Makenna Henry & Danciana (31.8)

Weekend Winners: One Weekend, 10 Events, One Million Blue Ribbons

Larkin Hill H.T. Training A division winners Cassie Sanger and Ultra Violet. Photo by Joan Davis / Flatlandsfoto.

Speaking of blue ribbons, you know who else deserves them? Horse show photographers. Exhibit A: Joan Davis of Flatlandsfoto, who stood out in what appears to be a hurricane to take pictures of Larkin Hill H.T. in Nassau, New York. The description Joan used was “craptastic weather,” and cross country was cancelled halfway through Novice. If you see her at Groton House H.T. later this month, be sure to thank her for her service!

What a busy weekend it was in the Eventing Nation, with 10 events taking place across the country. That’s a heck of a lot of winners! The honor of lowest finishing score of the weekend goes to Jane Bok and Santino, who scored a 19.3 to win the Novice A division at Larkin Hill H.T. Well done, Jane.

And now, your weekend winners!

Larkin Hill H.T. [Final Scores]
Prelim/Training: John Roach & Royal View (30.2)
Training A: Cassie Sanger & Ultra Violet (20.0)
Training B: Leah Meisterling & Ardeo Hill Hero (32.9)
Novice A: Jane Bok & Santino (19.3)
Novice B: Kelly Rooney & Dresden Silver (29.5)
Novice C: Darrah Alexander & Shirsheen Du Carel (29.5)
Beginner Novice-A: Adelaide Grave & Toby (32.1)
Beginner Novice-B: Catherine Barstow & Jazper (36.5)
Beginner Novice-C: Caitlin Niedzialkowski & Hasanna (39.5)
Beginner Novice-D: Kristen Smith & Ballinamurra Destiny (33.8)
Beginner Novice-E: Yuki Igari & Poppin Good Pic (32.8)
Intro A: Willow Crowley & LFS Jumpin’ Jack Flash (32.2)
Intro B: Nicole Banks & Easy Breeze (32.5)
Intro C: Lisa Jones & Katnis (34.7)

Aspen Farm H.T. [Final Scores]
CCI3*-Short: Sara Sellmer & PDQ Leigh (32.7)
CCI2*-Short: Kayla Dumler & Faramir (34.8)
Open Intermediate: Stephanie Goodman & Drs Resolute (32.5)
Open Preliminary A: Mikayla Hoffman & Eli (31.3)
Open Preliminary B: Madison Langerak & Normandy’s Kivalo (24.1)
Jr. Training: Madelyn Myers & Bare Necessities (34.5)
Open Training: Marc Grandia & Rubel (27.2)
Training Horse: David Adamo & Solaguayre California (26.4)
Training Rider: Bobbie Smith-Ede & Winston (28.8)
Jr. Novice: Lilly Linder & Mia San Mia (23.3)
Novice Amateur: Tracy Stein & Apollo (29.2)
Novice Horse: Jennifer Dunzelman & Hardscrabble Salem (30.2)
Novice Rider: Piper Newman & Ferngully (30.0)
Beginner Novice Horse: Jordan Linstedt & Lovely Lola (25.0)
Beginner Novice Rider: Karen King & Deadwood Sage (41.5)
Jr. Beginner Novice: Makenna Henry & Danciana (31.8)

Woodland Stallion Station H.T. [Final Scores]
Open Preliminary: Taylor Mcfall & High Times (36.8)
Open Training: Leah Yacoub & Halperin Zahara (29.3)
Open Novice: Carrie Finno & Kaiden (40.9)
YR Novice: Lexie Gonzalez & Le Salvan (29.8)
Jr/YR BN: Faith Dalessandro & Spurs and Stilettos (25.0)
Open BN: Anne Morgan & Sonic (29.7)
Introductory A: Matilda Hickman-Smith & Roxstar FSF (29.7)
Introductory B: Giuliana Battistella-bunce & Pluto (31.9)
FEH-2 Year-old-Open: Jillian Terzian & Nsf Bye The Way (83.3)
FEH-3 Year-old-Open: Max Gerdes & Bounce DFEN (79.9)

View this post on Instagram

I had a fabulous show with my new students this weekend, at the Woodland Stallion Station one day horse trials. Bella and Ziva showed continued improvement in their dressage, despite some spooky shadows near the judges box, and finished up in 6th place. Max and Hazelwood achieved a personal best dressage score, as did Jess and Sunny who managed to win their BN dressage with a whopping 24.4%, taking the highest score of the whole show! Lucy and her wonder pony pulled off a 2nd place finish at novice with a much improved score, and finally Matilda Hickman-Smith brought home a blue ribbon, finishing in first place on her dressage score of 29.7%. Thank you to Natalie Brady for the fabulous jumping warmup for Matilda and Roxy, and to John Robertson of Tayside Sporthorses for all the wonderful jumping training at home.

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Seneca Valley Pony Club H.T. [Final Scores]
Open Intermediate: Ryan Wood & Chusinmyconfession (34.0)
Open Preliminary: Ryan Wood & Zempat (35.0)
Open Preliminary 2: Arden Wildasin & Southern Sun (33.5)
Open Training 1: Colleen Rutledge & Global Absolute (30.5)
Open Training 2: Jaclyn Burke & Chance of Hidden Heights (34.0)
Modified 1: Rebecca Hagy & Lusi (31.7)
Modified 2: Emily Shilling & Enchanting Class (26.8)
Open Novice 1: Jackie Smith & Savvy Joe (32.2)
Open Novice 2: Grace Gaynor & Jaunty Doll (30.2)
Novice Junior: Lainey Phillips & Netherfield Park (30.7)
Novice Senior: Lindsay Berreth & Oh So Extreme (26.7)
Beginner Novice Young Rider: Bryanna Sealor & Lion (31.4)
Beginner Novice Junior: Addison Leigh & Birch (28.1)
Open Beginner Novice 1: Mogie Bearden-Muller & Quebracho Z (30.6)
Open Beginner Novice 2: Michaline West & Southport (29.6)
Elementary Junior: McKenna Miller & Max’s Painted Moon (32.8)
Elementary Senior: Hannah Hawkins & Autopilot WRF (30.6)

Full Gallop Farm June H.T. [Final Scores]
Intermediate/Preliminary: Nilson Moreira da Silva & Fernhill Rock Phantom (46.8)
Preliminary: Nilson Moreira da Silva & Suite One (41.2)
Preliminary/Training: Kaitlin Hartford & FGF Gray Not Bay (43.5)
Training: Morgan Batton & Sommersby (30.0)
Novice-A: Grace Boni & Rio Grande (27.9)
Novice-B: Barbara Stelling & Holy City (32.1)
Beginner Novice-A: Kristen Wilson & FGF Wonderwall (25.8)
Beginner Novice-B: Lauren Turner & King Of Queens IV (24.8)
Starter (Tadpole): Jullian Woolridge & Highland of Hope (31.9)

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So proud of the team today competing at @full.gallop.farm 8 solid days of our summer intensive training camp payed off with great results across the board‼️special shout-out to @ag.eventing for her help grooming and getting us to our rides on time! Extra special shoutout to our team dads who endlessly support the endeavors of their riders!Thanks for spending your Father’s Day with us for another #horseshowweekend • • • • Thank you to our sponsors for supporting our team! @County_Saddlery_Georgia @BGoneWhitelineGA @TheHitchandTow @Correct_Connect_ @HarbinEquineandFarm • • #OTTBsOfInstagram #OTTB #BestForBacks #CrossCountry #XC #Chestnut #KneesUP #KneesToNose #Eventing #EventerProblems #EventersOfInstagram #TeamWool #FlyingAgain #FairwayKing #RetiredRacehorse #Bay

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Golden Spike H.T. [Final Scores]
Preliminary Open: Rosie Smith & Seamus (27.9)
Preliminary/Training-Open: Shallary Guymon & Coco Chanel (57.2)
Training Open: Katie Frickel & Epaulet (37.1)
Novice Junior: EmmaLee Tanner & Maximus (27.1)
Novice Open B: Anika Bronfman & Sidecar (29.3)
Novice-Open A: Julianne Calder & Lismore (29.3)
BNovice Junior: Cassidy Dixon & Pippy (23.6)
BNovice Open A: Colleen Christie & Billy Montana (23.9)
BNovice Open B: Mindy Groth-Hussey & Viniq (25.3)
Intro-Junior: Taya Hess & Javamon (34.7)
Intro-Open: Paula Cudd & Latte (25.8)

Valinor Farm H.T. [Final Scores]
Modified: Susan Gornall & Abounding Angel (36.0)
Open Training: Paige Crotty & Excel Star Armina Z (25.7)
Training Rider: Jillian Middaugh & Miss Behaved (39.5)
Novice Junior: Kiera Delalhanty & Silver Wand (26.7)
Novice Rider: Andrew Beal & Capstone’s MJ Tasmainia (26.4)
Open Novice: Babette Lenna-Gonyea & Ardeo Rock and Roll (20.2)
Beginner Novice Junior: Grace Valvano & Salvatorio (31.1)
Beginner Novice Rider: Linnea Ackerman & Farrington’s Rothaarige (32.8)
Open Beginner Novice: Mike Robbins & horse (28.1)
Intro: Kendall Turney & Take Another Road (39.4)

Bucks County Horse Park H.T. [Final Scores]
Preliminary/Training: Caroline Martin & Ideal (32.7)
Training: Jennie Brannigan & O’Meara (25.5)
Novice 1: Caroline Martin & Redfield Bajall (24.3)
Novice 2: Leanne Hobbs & Fault Free (Tizzy) (31.7)
Beginner Novice 2: Abigail Sweger & Unforced (28.0)
Beginner Novice 1: Caroline Martin & HSH First Impression (33.5)

Silverwood Farm H.T. [Final Scores]

Honey Run H.T. [Final Scores]

Congrats to all. Go Eventing!

#EventerProblems Vol. 185, Presented by Haygain: Humans of Eventing, Part II

Photo via the Humans of Eventing Facebook page.

If you haven’t already been introduced to the Humans of Eventing Facebook page, I implore you to go explore this majestic corner of dark web eventing internet. While I don’t have absolute confirmation about the page’s founder, I have a very strong guess, which readers are welcome to confirm or dispute in the comments. Please know that you are much beloved by the eventing community, [name redacted].

Humans of Eventing is, at its essence, #EventerProblems at its finest — as evidenced by this sampling of posts. Bonus: some adorable dog photos. If you missed Part I, check it out here. Today we present Part II!

“My tombstone will read that I should have entered beginner novice”

Overheard in the barns at Spring Bay

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, April 6, 2019

“I took off from a different zip code!”

Overheard after a cross country run at Galway

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Friday, March 29, 2019

“If people can have a stuffed pony strapped to them on cross country. I can have a box of wine”

Overheard during a course walk

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Sunday, February 10, 2019

“You notice more shadows than Punxsutawney Phil”

Heard out on Cross Country

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, February 9, 2019

“I see you and him doing this in forward four strides”

“I kinda just see him leaving me here and going back to the barns”

Overheard during a course walk

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, February 9, 2019

“At least don’t break my expensive reins!!”

A rider yells to her horse as he canters on without her.

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, October 20, 2018

“Not to go into details but I am glad I wore the darker pants”

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Sunday, September 30, 2018

“Jump the A, throw up a little, then jump the B.”

Heard out on a cross country course walk

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, September 29, 2018

“How did she look through the coffin?”

“Honey, like I’ve told you… I only know how football is supposed to look”

Overheard out on cross country

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Sunday, September 16, 2018

“I love you but your half halt is broken”

Heard out on cross country

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, September 1, 2018

And … because a photo is worth 1,000 words:

He dunked his head in the vet box water tanks and then did this for the interviews. Nox couldn’t let his father have all the fun.

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Go Eventing!

Haygain is a science driven company with the horse’s health as the primary focus.

We are committed to improving equine health through scientific research, product innovation and consumer education in respiratory and digestive health. Developed by riders, for riders, we understand the importance of clean forage and a healthy stable environment in maintaining the overall well-being of the horse.

Our Haygain hay steamers are recommended by the world’s leading riders, trainers and equine vets and ComfortStall® Sealed Orthopedic Flooring System is used and recommended by leading Veterinary Hospitals, including Cornell University.

#EventerProblems Vol. 184, Presented by Haygain: Humans of Eventing, Part I

Photo via the Humans of Eventing Facebook page.

If you haven’t already been introduced to the Humans of Eventing Facebook page, I implore you to go explore this majestic corner of dark web eventing internet. While I don’t have absolute confirmation about the page’s founder, I have a very strong guess, which readers are welcome to confirm or dispute in the comments. Please know that you are much beloved by the eventing community, [name redacted].

Humans of Eventing is, at its essence, #EventerProblems at its finest — as evidenced by this sampling of posts. Bonus: some adorable dog photos. Stay tuned for part II.

“Where was his problem?”

“Oh just anything that involved steering.”

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Sunday, June 9, 2019

“Fat log?”

“They named that big log before the water the Fat Log on the map.”

“Seems a bit harsh doesn’t it?”…

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Sunday, June 2, 2019

“Whew! She did awesome!!”

“That wasn’t our daughter.”

“We just had to buy a brown one huh?”

Overheard during cross country

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Sunday, June 2, 2019

“Another weekend foiled by the unseen Loch Ness monster in the water complex.”

Overheard near cross country

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Sunday, May 26, 2019

“Why do they call them questions?”

“Because..”

“…..because they make you question your sanity.”

Overhead during a course walk with a student, trainer, and assistant trainer.

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, May 25, 2019

“Let’s see which horse of this horse I have today.”

Overheard by a rider entering stadium

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Friday, May 24, 2019

“Well she hasn’t thrown up yet.”

Overheard outside of a dressage ring

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Sunday, May 12, 2019

“Here is my whip to hit me.”

Said by a rider after a dressage test to her trainer

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, May 11, 2019

“….. so yeah in theory I’ve paid money to come be nervous for people I hardly know.”

Overheard at Land Rover

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Thursday, April 25, 2019

“Where was your problem?”

“The problem was he didn’t want to participate in the same sport as I did today.”

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Saturday, June 8, 2019

And … because a picture is worth 1,000 words:

“Take a picture and title it Mother Mucker”

Posted by Humans of Eventing on Thursday, November 15, 2018

Go Eventing!

Haygain is a science driven company with the horse’s health as the primary focus.

We are committed to improving equine health through scientific research, product innovation and consumer education in respiratory and digestive health. Developed by riders, for riders, we understand the importance of clean forage and a healthy stable environment in maintaining the overall well-being of the horse.

Our Haygain hay steamers are recommended by the world’s leading riders, trainers and equine vets and ComfortStall® Sealed Orthopedic Flooring System is used and recommended by leading Veterinary Hospitals, including Cornell University.

Sunday Video: Speed Around Luhmühlen CCI4*-S XC with Andrew Hoy

Australia’s Andrew Hoy and Vassily de Lassos posted one of seven double-clear rounds out of 51 Luhmühlen CCI4*-S cross country starters, and the fastest time of their division. Now he’s posted the helmet cam so that we can ride along.

You’ll recall this striking chestnut powerhouse from the 2018 World Equestrian Games in Tryon, where the 10-year-old Anglo-Arab gelding (Jaguar Mail x Illusion Perdue, by Jalienny), owned by Paula and David Evans and the rider, finished 4th.

You know it’s serious when there’s unicorn emoji involved!

The pair sits 7th heading into Luhmühlen show jumping on their dressage score of 31.8. You can view the complete CCI4*-S leaderboard here. A German is almost guaranteed to take the win … but which one?

We’ll be along shortly with a full report from the headlining CCI5* division, which has been won by Tim Price and the great grey mare Ascona M.

Go Eventing.

Luhmühlen: WebsiteEntries & Start TimesLive ScoresLive StreamEN’s CoverageEN’s TwitterEN’s Instagram

The Usual Suspects: It’s Still Michi-Ingrid-Julia After Luhmühlen CCI4*-S Cross Country

Julia Krajewski (GER) with Samourai du Thot. Photo by Adrian Fohl.

It’s wildly entertaining to see Germany’s eventing heavyweights duking it out at the top of the Luhmühlen CCI4*-S Meßmer Trophy leaderboard, and the cage match continued on the cross country course today. The top two after dressageJulia Krajewski with Samourai du Thot and Ingrid Klimke with SAP Asha P, refused to budge, while third-placed Michael Jung kept his rank but switched out the horse.

When Luhmühlen got drenched with what EN’s boots-on-the-ground (Wellies, we hope!) reporter Tilly Berendt described as “an epic bucketload of rain,” the CCI4*-S cross country start got pushed back to lunchtime to allow for the floodwaters to recede get syphoned out by the local fire department.

Michael Jung was first out on course with his previously third-placed mount Creevagh Cooley. The mare, a new ride for Michael, fell at the second element of the #5ABC combination, a corner between two log skinnies. Bionic as ever, Michael went on to pilot his two other rides, Highlighter and Corazon, successfully around the course. A clear, fast round propelled Highlighter from 7th into 3rd; Corazon had 8.8 time penalties to move from 8th to 16th.

“I am super pleased with this young horse,” Michael said of Highlighter, an 8-year-old stallion. “He’s still a little green and I’ve brought him on slowly but today I was able to ride him a little faster to stay within the time and he presented himself beautifully in this difficult course.”

A tenth of a point separate Julia and Ingrid, who remain 1-2 on their dressage scores of 24.7 and 24.8 respectively. By all accounts the footing was no worse for the wear after the morning storms, as Luhmühlen’s ground can apparently take a lot of water and was excellently prepared. But the umbrellas lining the galloping lines did, apparently, take some horses by surprise — including the CCI4*-S leader.

“I know Sam really well and vice versa, which always helps,” Julia said. “At first he glanced at all the umbrellas but quickly focused back on me and the job at hand. He was superb and gave me a fabulous feeling all the way. Luckily he rides so well, which saves a lot of time at the fences.”

Ingrid was over the moon with Asha P’s performance today. “I was thrilled the mare rode so positively all the way round,” she reflected. “She thoroughly enjoyed our round and so did I. The spectators are brilliant and they really carried us round the course. Asha is a super fast horse and she rode just as I thought she would.”

German riders hold the next two leaderboard spots as well. Felix Etzel and Bandit are currently in 4th: “I am so happy we stayed without any jumping penalties in this technical course. Unfortunately, we didn’t quite make the optimum time. Bandit seemed a little taken aback by the atmosphere at first, but his concentration improved throughout the course.”

Rounding out the top five is Dirk Schrade with Unteam de la Cense, who jumped clear with 1.2 time penalties. “The ground was surprisingly good after all that rain we had this morning,” Dirk said. “But the quality of the grounds in Luhmühlen has always been very excellent. My horse was fantastic to ride but for me it was important to finish this course safe and sound.”

Japan’s Yoshiaki Oiwa is 6th with Bart L JRA.“So far my horse has only competed at smaller events last season and we haven’t been a team for long,” Yoshiaki said. “Today he rode amazingly and I could not be more pleased. This horse is quite shy and I thought he might find the atmosphere a little troublesome but he was great!”

As we noted yesterday, Luhmühlen’s CCI4*-S competition might not have top billing but it’s as equally fierce as the CCI5*-L headliner. A German dream team for the 2019 FEI European Championships is clearly under construction … who will we see back at Luhmühlen, which is hosting the Euros, in August? Stay tuned.

You can view the complete CCI4*-S leaderboard here.

CCI4*-S Top 10 After Cross Country:

 

Luhmühlen: WebsiteEntries & Start TimesLive ScoresLive StreamEN’s CoverageEN’s TwitterEN’s Instagram

Jill of All Trades: Watch Ingrid Klimke Post a PB Score in the Grand Prix Freestyle at Wiesbaden

Why do the Germans keep kicking everyone’s butts all over the place, all of the time? Certainly a piece of the puzzle is that, as opposed to being mediocre in three disciplines, the best Germans have become specialists in each of eventing’s three phases. Exhibit A: Michael Jung’s sideline success as a show jumper, or — see video above — Ingrid Klimke’s proficiency in the straight dressage arena. Sure, she’s got dressage in her DNA (literally), but it’s still impressive.

The video, posted by Dressage Hub, shows Ingrid performing her winning Grand Prix CDI4* Freestyle at last weekend’s Wiesbaden aboard Franziskus, an 11-year-old Hanoverian stallion (Fidertanz 2 x Antara, by Alabaster) owned by Wilhelm Holkenbrink. Her score, an 80.68%, was the highest dressage score of her career and her first above 80%.

In addition to winning the Freestyle, the pair won the CDI4* Grand Prix as well on 74.3%. And then Ingrid went on to place 3rd in Wiesbaden’s Event Rider Masters CCI4*-S class with SAP Hale Bob OLD. Their dressage score? An ERM record-breaking 16.4. See EN’s Wiesbaden report here.

Ingrid is currently second in the Luhmühlen CCI4*-S with SAP Asha P, just a tenth of a point behind leaders Julia Krajewski with Samourai du Thot after the cross country phase. Read EN’s cross country report here; you can view the complete CCI4*-S leaderboard here.

Go eventing — and eventing with a little dressage on the side!

Friday Video from SmartPak: Storm Around Wiesbaden ERM XC With Fernhill By Night

USA represent! Liz Halliday-Sharp with Fernhill By Night made short work of the Event Rider Masters CCI4*-S cross country course last Saturday at the Longines PfingstTurnier Wiesbaden in German. The pair picked up 3.6 cross country time penalties to finish 7th overall on a score of 29.2, a fantastic result — that the score didn’t even crack the top five is a testament to the quality of the world-class field. (Michael Jung and Star Connection ultimately won the division; see EN’s report here.)

Close out your week with a virtual spin around Rüdiger Schwarz’s challenging track aboard Liz’s partner “Blackie.”

Wiesbaden: ERM WebsiteEvent WebsiteResultsLive Stream

Go Eventing.

Julia Krajewski and Samourai du Thot Steal Luhmühlen CCI4*-S Dressage Lead

Julia Krajewski and Samourai du Thot. Photo by Thomas Ix.

Luhmühlen’s Meßmer Trophy CCI4*-S competition might not have top billing, but it’s as equally fierce as the CCI5*-L headliner. The division is a stocked pond of German heavy-hitters, as it typically is in a championship year — Luhmühlen will also host the 2019 FEI European Championships on Aug. 28-Sept. 1.

Not surprisingly, the German contingent holds nine out of the top 10 placings after the completion of CCI4*-S dressage today. Julia Krajewski and Samourai du Thot took the lead on 24.7. This extremely competitive pair has won the last seven international events they’ve completed and were leading the Event Rider Masters CCI4*-S last week after the dressage and show jumping phases before opting out of the final phase.

“Sam was very relaxed during the last few days, but today he was a bit of a handful,” Julia commented after their test. “Maybe I should have ridden him a second time yesterday, in order to be able to ride out the highlights even more in the test today. Nevertheless, I’m very satisfied with the result and think it’s good that the judges stayed true to their line throughout the entire competition.”

Looking ahead to cross country on Saturday, Julia said, “The course is more demanding than last year, absolutely worthy of a German Championship. Especially #5ABC and the water complexes are very technical. I don’t think it will be too easy to stay within the time as there are many questions during the course that require precise riding. Luckily Sam is a very fast horse with a good canter.”

Ingrid Klimke with SAP Asha P. Photo by Thomas Ix.

Breathing down their neck, just a tenth of a point behind, is Ingrid Klimke with SAP Asha P on a 24.8. “It’s great how strong the mare’s nerves were in this atmospheric dressage arena,” Ingrid said. “She was really eager and highly motivated, while being relaxed at the same time. I was positively surprised, how well Asha managed to cope with the great Luhmühlen atmosphere.”

Michael Jung with Creevagh Cooley. Photo by Thomas Ix.

Rounding out the top three is Michael Jung with Creevagh Cooley on 25.6. Michael has three horses in the top 10 — Highlighter is 7th, and Corazon is 8th. “I have only been riding this mare a few weeks now and I am more than happy with her performance today,” he said of his top-placed mount. “She was extremely easy to ride, and I believe she is a really special horse with a bright future.

“I really like this year’s course,” he continued. “I think the Meßmer water complex could be tricky for some horses but I’m looking forward to riding the course on Saturday in front of the crowd here in Luhmühlen.”

A preview of the CCI4*-S cross country course, courtesy of CrossCountry App:

Hans Melzer, Germany’s team coach, noted the high standard in this year’s dressage phase: “The atmosphere is quite electric in the arena but all German horses presented themselves very well this morning.”

Of the course, Hans remarked, “I believe this year’s course is more demanding in comparison to last year. However, at the end of the track, there are fewer downhill tracks, which should be more comfortable for the horses.”

CCI4*-S Top 10 After Dressage:

You can view the complete CCI4*-S leaderboard here. Much more still to come — keep it here, EN!

Go Eventing.

Luhmühlen: WebsiteEntries & Start TimesLive ScoresLive StreamEN’s CoverageEN’s TwitterEN’s Instagram

Gemma Tattersall Speeds to Bolesworth Eventing Grand Prix Win

Gemma Tattersall and Santiago Bay. Photo courtesy of the Equerry Bolesworth International Horse Show.

Great Britain’s Equerry Bolesworth International Horse Show is an extravaganza of equestrian sport, featuring five days of top multi-discipline competition along with exhibitions and entertainment. There’s Grand Prix dressage, Grand Prix show jumping and — yes — Grand Prix eventing, a speed event over show jumps and cross country fences in a single round.

A five-star lineup of riders headed to Thursday evening’s Cazenove Capital Eventing Grand Prix at Bolesworth, one of what is now a three-leg Eventing Grand Prix series. Gemma Tattersall emerged as the ultimate winner, tackling the course at a blistering pace aboard Santiago Bay to win by a staggering eight-second margin. Their victory earned the Sussex-based rider the £2,000 top prize and qualification for a place in the final at the Theraplate UK Liverpool International Horse Show later this year.

“It was a fantastic class,” said Gemma. “It is my first time here at Bolesworth — I aim to be back for the Young Horse Championship in August — and Santiago Bay is a very special horse. We have a great partnership.”

Santiago Bay, an 11-year-old Irish Sport Horse mare (Ars Vivendi x Zantus, by Aldatus Z) owned by Caroline Teltsch, completed the Pau CCI5* last year and has had top three finishes at Chatsworth, Blair Castle and Barbury Castle. Gemma is on a roll herself, fresh off a win in the Bramham CCI4*-S last week with Quicklook V.

A last-jump joker fence — which added or subtracted five seconds from the rider’s final time, depending on whether it was cleared or not — proved influential throughout, but Gemma and Santiago won the gamble with ease.

“She always says yes to every question, and I had a fantastic time in there. She gave me a great ride,” Gemma said. “I do quite a lot of show jumping as well as eventing, and so does this horse. She is very used to going against the clock, and I basically rode a show jumping round against the clock over cross country fences, if that makes sense.

“She is a very fast horse, and we have got a great partnership. We are kind of on wheels, really, the pair of us. Every fence and line came up perfectly.”

Watch Gemma and Santiago’s winning ride:

Worth the drive winner eventers Grand Prix bolesworth

Posted by Gary Stevens on Thursday, June 13, 2019

The course was designed by Mark Phillips, who will also build the challenges for the Liverpool finalists in December.

“We saw some great sport,” he said. “This type of class takes the sport of eventing to a different audience, and I think it has a great role to play. Gemma was fantastic, wasn’t she? She is on flying form at the moment, and she continued it tonight.

He explained that Liverpool will be a different type of competition: “It is a smaller arena, and there won’t be so much galloping between the fences, but hopefully we can make it just as exciting.”

“I only had 30 minutes to set the course up. When I go to other events, I have got six months! Hopefully, we did a good job tonight.”

View complete results at the website here.