Jenni Autry
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Jenni Autry

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About Jenni Autry

Originally from San Diego, Jenni discovered eventing thanks to the Bedford Hunt Pony Club in Virginia. After working in both newspapers and magazines, she joined the EN team in 2012. She travels extensively covering the U.S. Eventing Team and has reported at the Olympic Games, World Equestrian Games, Pan American Games, and every CCI4* in the Northern Hemisphere. As to her favorite event, it’s a toss-up between Aachen and Boekelo. She lives with her husband and three cats in Pennsylvania.

Latest Articles Written

Kentucky Entry Updates: Lynn Symansky Withdraws Under Suspection

Frankie Thieriot Stutes and Chatwin at Fair Hill 2018. Photo by Jenni Autry.

As we count down to the 2019 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event, presented by MARS Equestrian, we have seen eight scratches from the entry list to drop the total number of possible starters to 45.

Frankie Thieriot Stutes and Chatwin, the reigning Dutta Corp National CCI4*-L Champions, were meant to make their five-star debut at Kentucky, but she announced that he sustained an injury in his final prep run at Twin Rivers.

“The universe has other plans for us, I have no idea why, but I am sure eventually I will figure that out,” Frankie said. “I have my horse, and luckily for me, he means much more to me as a partner than the ribbons or accolades we have earned and will earn together. A 5* is not in the cards this month, but we will have another chance at that.”

Caroline Martin also withdrew The Apprentice, who has been sold to Argentinian event rider Javier Rawson as his prospective Pan American Games mount. She will still ride five-star debutants Danger Mouse and Islandwood Captain Jack.

Ryan Wood and Emily Beshear both withdrew their sole mounts in Woodstock Bennett and Silver Night Lady, respectively.

Clayton Fredericks and FE Ophelia at Red Hills 2019. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Clayton Fredericks, one of three past Kentucky winners entered in this year’s field, was meant to return to the five-star level for the first time since Burghley in 2012, but he has withdrawn his sole ride, FE Ophelia.

Allie Knowles also withdrew Sound Prospect, one of 12 Thoroughbreds entered in the field. Click here to read more about the Thoroughbreds competing at Kentucky this year.

Lauren Kieffer also withdrew Landmark’s Monte Carlo, one of three horses she had entered to compete. “Patrick” is now entered in the CCI3*-S at Jersey Fresh and will aim for Bromont, with Vermiculus and Paramount Importance going to Kentucky.

“For all of Patrick’s fans, he won’t be galloping across the bluegrass this year,” Lauren said. “We always planned to only compete two of three entered. Usually fate and luck makes that decision for you (and still could!) but we’re lucky enough to have to choose between three fit and ready horses. Patty drew the short straw but you’ll see him tackling Bromont shortly.”

Lynn Symansky and Under Suspection. Photo by Leslie Threlkeld.

Lynn Symansky announced April 20 that she has withdrawn Mary Ann Ghadban’s Under Suspection due to a non-soundness related injury.

“While Pippy is sound and fit and ready to go, she unfortunately developed a large fluid filled pocket directly under her girth area, preventing Lynn from being able to comfortably secure a saddle onto her,” Lynn said. “Pippy’s welfare is paramount, and running Kentucky without a saddle is not the most viable backup option.”

Click here to view the updated drawn order. While there are 46 horses on the list, Buck Davidson can only ride three of his four horses, so the maximum number of starters is currently 45. This marks the lowest number of entries in Kentucky’s recent history, just edging ahead of the 2013 event, which saw 46 starters.

Keep it locked on EN as we count down to Kentucky. Go Eventing.

This article was updated on April 20 to add additional scratches.

Teams Named for North American Futures Team Challenge at Bromont

Teams have been announced for the next USEF/USET Foundation North American Futures Team Challenge, which will take place at the MARS Equestrian Bromont Three-Day Event on June 5-9, 2019, in Quebec, Canada.

Established with the USET Foundation and administered by USEF, the North American Futures Team Challenge is designed to complement the Eventing High Performance Program, which recently rolled out the new U.S. Eventing Pathway Program.

Two teams of four combinations, one coached by U.S. Eventing Director of High Performance Erik Duvander and one coached by USEF Eventing Emerging Athlete Coach Leslie Law, will participate in training and contest an unofficial simulated team competition at Bromont.

The following horses and riders have been named to Erik Duvander’s team:

  • Kimmy Cecere and Landmark’s Monaco
  • Sydney Conley Elliott and QC Diamantaire
  • Allie Knowles and Business Class
  • Kylie Lyman and Xuanatu

The following horses and riders have been named to Leslie Law’s team:

  • Alex Baugh and Ballingowan Pizazz
  • Cosby Green and Highly Suspicious
  • Mallory Hogan and Clarissa Purisma
  • Alyssa Phillips and Oskar

Erik Duvander’s team won the inaugural USEF/USET Foundation North American Futures Team Challenge at Carolina International last month.

Click here to learn more about the North American Futures Team Challenge.

Go Eventing.

Larkin Hill Horse Trials to Add Preliminary Division Starting July 2019

Photo courtesy of Larkin Hill. 

Following the loss of multiple high-profile horse trials in USEA’s Area I, Larkin Hill has committed to adding a Preliminary division starting with the July 21 one-day event at the 100-acre venue in North Chatham, New York.

Event organizer Margie Hutchison said in adding a Preliminary division she hopes Larkin Hill can help fill the void in Area I following the cancellation of Stuart Horse Trials, King Oak Farm Horse Trials and Fitch’s Corner Horse Trials.

“Our course designer Tremaine Cooper has assured us that we have the land at Larkin Hill to accommodate a Preliminary course,” Margie said. “As many of you know — if you have organized, officiated or volunteered at, ridden in, supported a horse or rider, or simply been a spectator at a horse trials — it literally takes a village for these competitions to become a reality. It is a massive effort, and an expensive investment for the future.”

In order to add the Preliminary level at the July 21 event, Larkin Hill will borrow portables from nearby venues in New York. Transporting the portables will cost an estimated $5,000, with building permanent Preliminary obstacles costing an estimated $30,000 to $40,000.

“In the true spirit of cooperation from our fantastic village of eventers, organizers Fernanda Kellogg of Fitch’s Corner and Louise Meryman of Millbrook Horse Trials have graciously and generously agreed to lend us the necessary portable jumps to help flesh out a complete and high standard cross-country course for this year,” Margie said.

“Our goal is to raise $50,000, not only to help make this Preliminary division a reality this year, but to help us build our own obstacles for the future.”

Larkin Hill has raised $2,000 of the $50,000 goal thus far. Click here to donate via GoFundMe. To make a tax-deductible donation through the American Horse Trials Foundation, please contact Sharyn Antico at 413-454-4158.

[Larkin Hill Horse Trials Preliminary XC Course GoFundMe]

Drawn Order Goes Live for 2019 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event

Oliver Townend and Cooley Master Class. Photo by Leslie Threlkeld.

With just 15 days to go until the first horse inspection at the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event, presented by MARS Equestrian, we now have the drawn order. Boyd Martin and his homebred Ray Price have been drawn first, followed by Caroline Martin and Islandwood Captain Jack — both horses are five-star first-timers.

Hot favorites Piggy French and Quarrycrest Echo have been drawn #30 and will likely do their dressage at the very end of Thursday or early Friday morning. Tim Price, who is on the trail to win a second leg of the Rolex Grand Slam with Xavier Faer, will be #40. As #44, defending winners Oliver Townend and Cooley Master Class will go towards the end of the day on Friday.

Phillip Dutton, the last American rider to win Kentucky in 2008, will follow Oliver as #45 with his U.S. World Equestrian Games mount Z. Lauren Kieffer and Vermiculus will be the final pair to go on Friday as #55.

Buck Davidson has four horses entered but can only ride three. Following Ryan Wood’s withdrawal of Woodstock Bennett, we are currently looking at 53 starters.

Keep it locked on EN for all the latest news on Kentucky as we count down to the Best Weekend All Year. Go Eventing.

[2019 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event Drawn Order]

The Fork at Tryon CCI4*-S Live Cross Country Updates: Boyd Martin and Tsetserleg Win!

Fence 24 – Lucky Fresh Splash. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Welcome to cross country day at The Fork at Tryon, presented by Lucky Clays Farm! We are counting down to the start of CCI4*-S cross country at 11:39 a.m. There is no live stream, but I will be running live updates here on EN. Keep refreshing this page for updates.

Capt. Mark Phillips’ course is 3,850 meters with an optimum time of 6 minutes, 35 seconds. Click here for a fence-by-fence preview. We wish safe rides to all! Go Eventing.

The Fork at Tryon: WebsiteRide TimesSunday XC Starting OrderLive ScoresEN’s CoverageInstagramTwitter

11:46: We had a slight change in order, and Hannah Sue Burnett and Harbor Pilot were our first pair to go. They jumped clear in a time of 7:30.

11:48: Overnight leaders Fernhill By Night are home clear and 28 seconds over to add 11.2 time penalties. That opens the door for others — this will be a race against the clock!

11:50: Boyd Martin is on course with his first ride, On Cue, and has officially vanquished that pesky boat in the water. They completed clear with 18.0 time penalties.

11:52: Doug Payne pulled up Vandiver near fence 4 to check his girth and continued on. He then pulled up again at fence 7 as his saddle keeps slipping back. He is retiring.

11:57: Clear in a time of 7:27 for Allison Springer and Sapphire Blue B.

12:02: Clear in a time of 7:48 for Daniela Mougel and Cecelia. They are aiming for a return trip to Kentucky and ultimately the Pan Ams to represent Mexico.

12:06: We will have some gaps in the action due to withdrawals. Chris Talley and Unmarked Bills are on course now.

12:09: Ryan Wood and Woodstock Bennett fell at fence 10A when the horse hung a leg. They are both up and ok and walking home.

12:11: Clear in a time of 7:30 for Chris Talley and Unmarked Bills. These two are aiming for their first Kentucky. Go Rookies!

12:16: Clear with 24.4 time penalties for Daniela Mougel and Cecelia.

12:17: Felix Vogg and Colero complete clear in a time of 6:54 — that’s the fastest so far. That moves them ahead of Liz Halliday-Sharp for the provisional lead in the early going.

12:22: Kim Liddell and Eye of the Storm completed clear in a time of 7 minutes, 30 seconds.

12:25: Clear in a time of 7:08 for Hallie Coon and Celien. It’s Hallie’s birthday today. Happy Birthday!

12:31: Clear in a time of 7:06 for Will Faudree and Michel 233.

12:32: Dasha Ivandaeva has retired Autorytet after two runouts at the corner at 16B.

12:37: Clear in a time of 7:03 for Sydney Conley Elliott and QC Diamantaire in the horse’s debut at the level.

12:39: Meghan O’Donoghue and Palm Crescent picked up a runout at 16B and are clear on second attempt.

12:42: We are still waiting for someone to catch the time. Felix Vogg has been the fastest with Colero and added 7.6 time penalties.

12:43: Chris Talley and Sandro’s Star had s glance off at the boat in the water at 11B. Clear on second attempt.

12:45: Rachel Wilks and Great Expectations had a runout at fence 9, the boat at the lake, and then another runout say 11D at the skinny following the up-bank at the water. Clear at the option.

12:47: Clear with 15.2 time penalties for Mara DePuy and Congo Brazzaville C.

12:48: Rachel and Great Expectations have been eliminated on refusals after picking up a third at the corner at 16B.

12:53: Sharon White and Cooley On Show had a stop at fence 24, the skinny in the last water. Clear on second attempt.

12:54: Kate Brown and Victor Z picked up a runout at the skinny wedge at 7D. Clear at the option. They then picked up another runout at 11A, the drop into the first water. She got his feet wet and retired.

12:57: Allison Springer and Business Ben glanced off the skinny brush coming down the hill at 10C. Clear on the option.

1:02: Allison and Business Ben picked up another runout at the second squirrel at 22B.

1:04: Dom Schramm and Bolytair B completed clear in a time of 7:42.

1:06: Boyd Martin and Tsetserleg add just 4.8 time penalties to move into the provisional lead. That is the fastest of the day!

1:11: Hannah Sue Burnett and Lukeswell complete clear with 20.4 time penalties.

1:15: Liz Halliday-Sharp and Deniro Z jumped clear with 14.8 time penalties. Boyd Martin wins with Tsetserleg!

1:20: Doug Payne and Quantum Leap added 12.4 time penalties as our last pair on course. Stay tuned for the full report.

Course Preview: Tryon’s WEG Track Reimagined for The Fork CCI4*-S

Fence 2 – WEG Oxer. Photo by Jenni Autry.

There’s a distinct sense of déjà vu walking the CCI4*-S course for The Fork here at Tryon International Equestrian Center, as much of Capt. Mark Phillips’ track resembles his course for the 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games — sans the much-discussed long uphill pull at the end.

Many of the same tricky combinations are identical or extremely similar to the WEG course: the influential water complex featuring the boat and waterfall up-bank, the double squirrels, and multiple questions with skinnies set on accuracy-demanding downhill approaches.

For Boyd Martin and Tsetserleg, who came to grief at the boat in the water at WEG last year and sit third here at The Fork going into cross country, it’s a chance for redemption.

Fence 11AB – Lucky Clays Marina. Photo by Jenni Autry.

“That water jump rode surprisingly tough, not only for me but for others. I think it’s going to be a bit easier because a lot of it had to do with the buses and the music and the tents and the people who were right up against the jumps,” Boyd said. “Definitely a lot of horses got distracted, and then all of a sudden the jump was in front of them, so that’s not there this year. I think it should ride a bit better, but it’s a world championship fence that caught some of the best in the world out, so it’s a great opportunity for these horses to ride around a true international track.”

Like the WEG course, there are numerous black flag options to give greener combinations more opportunities to execute a clear round. But for pairs who want to catch the optimum time of 6 minutes, 35 seconds, taking the direct routes will be paramount. The undulating terrain also makes the time more difficult to catch on this twisty, winding track — only three pairs managed it in the CCI4*-S last year.

Fence 22AB – Squirrels. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Liz Halliday-Sharp leads after show jumping with Fernhill By Night, better known as “Blackie,” and sits second with Deniro Z, who is preparing for the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event. Blackie is coming off a win at Carolina International two weeks ago, and Liz’s goal is to keep the hot streak alive.

“Blackie goes to every event trying to win — that’s all we do with him now. He’s 16 now and doesn’t run a lot, so we’ll give it my best shot. I think he’s up to it, and feeling the best he’s ever felt in his life,” Liz said.

“For Deniro, my plan is very much focused on Kentucky now. I wouldn’t say I’m going to go out and be very slow, but I’m not going to go out and be like a mad person. Most importantly, I want that rideability and to take jumps out of stride that can come out of stride.”

The footing feels fantastic thanks to steady rain yesterday morning, and we are in for a thrilling day of cross country tomorrow. CCI4*-S cross country starts at 11:40 p.m. There is no live stream, but I will be running live updates here on EN. Scroll down for a fence-by-fence preview of the CCI4*-S course. Go Eventing.

The Fork at Tryon Links: WebsiteRide Times, Sunday XC Starting OrderLive ScoresEN’s CoverageInstagramTwitter

USEF Announces Potential Selection Trials for 2020 Olympic Games

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

USEF has announced the potential list of selection trials for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. The final list of selection trials will be published as part of the approved Eventing Selection Procedure for the 2020 Olympic Games.

2019

  • Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event Event (USA) – CCI5*-L – April 24-29
  • Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials (GBR) – CCI5*-L – May 1-5
  • Jersey Fresh International Three-Day Event (USA) – CCI4*-L – May 8-12
  • Tattersalls International Horse Trials (IRE) – CCI4*-L – May 29-31
  • Bromont CCI Three-Day Event (CAN) – CCI4*-L – June 6-9
  • Longines Luhmühlen Horse Trials (GER) – CCI5*-L – June 13-16
  • CHIO Aachen (GER) – CCI4*-S – July 18-20
  • The Event at Rebecca Farm (USA) – CCI4*-L – July 25-28
  • Millstreet International Horse Trials (IRE) – CCI4*-L – Aug. 22-25
  • Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials (GBR) – CCI5*-L – Sept. 5-8
  • Military Boekelo – Enschede (NED) – CCI4*-L – Oct. 10-13
  • The Dutta Corp Fair Hill International (USA) – CCI4*-L – Oct. 16-20
  • Ocala Jockey Club International Three-Day Event (USA) – CCI4*-L – Nov. 13-17

2020

  • Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event (USA) – CCI5*-L – April 24-29
  • Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials (GBR) – CCI5*-L – May 6-10
  • Jersey Fresh International Three-Day Event (USA) – CCI4*-L – May 8-12

Additional selection events may be added to this list. CCI4*-L and CCI5*-L events in Europe running from April 26, 2019, to June 1, 2020, may be considered as selection trials, but only with the approval of the selectors and the USEF Eventing Sport Committee.

Any rider wishing to use a European CCI4*-L or CCI5*-L event as a selection trial that is not included on this list must make the request in writing to the USEF Managing Director of Eventing no less than 30 days prior to the start of the competition for consideration by the USEF Eventing Sport Committee or an Ad Hoc Group approved by the USEF Eventing Sport Committee.

The selection process will be similar in process and criteria used to for the 2019 Pan American Games. Click here to read the U.S. Pan American Games Selection Procedures.

Monday News & Notes from Fleeceworks

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Very special treat to see the remarkable partnership that is @jontyeventing & ‘Art’ COOLEY ROURKES DRIFT who made an appearance at @bedeevents Belton today What a special treat to see the hard work that Jonty and the team have put into his recovery and the gorgeous Art lapping up the applause from the excited crowd – a privilege to witness. #Eventing #BritishEventing #BE #XC #Equestrian #Dressage #Showjumping #CrossCountry #EquestrianPhotography #EquinePhotography #Horse #Cheval #Pferd #Riding #HorseTrials #Twohearts #GoEventing #RidersWithStyle #EventingStyle #RuralLifestyle #EquestrianLife #EquestrianStyle #HorsesofInstagram #HorsePhoto #HannahColePhotography #Sony #Alpha

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One year after his victory in the Grantham Cup at Belton, Jonty Evans returned to the venue to make his first public appearance riding Cooley Rorkes Drift since his traumatic brain injury at Tattersalls in June 2018. Jonty spent six weeks in a coma and has made nothing short of a miraculous recovery, returning to riding and even tackling his first full show jumping course since the fall last month. Be sure to follow Jonty Evans Eventing on Facebook to track his continued progress in his recovery.

[Jonty Evans and Cooley Rorkes Drift delight crowds with Belton appearance]

National Holiday: National Sourdough Bread Day

Weekend Results:

Galway Downs International H.T. [Final Scores]

Belton International [Final Scores]

Morven Park Spring H.T. [Final Scores]

Rocking Horse Spring H.T. [Final Scores]

Full Gallop Farm March II H.T. [Final Scores]

Texas Rose March H.T. [Final Scores]

Your Monday News & Notes:

Tom McEwen delivered a surprise win with Figaro Van Het Broekxhof in the Grantham Cup CCI4*-S at Belton. Just four of the 89 combinations that completed cross country managed to catch the optimum time. Follow the link for an audio interview with Tom discussing his win. [Tom McEwen wins Lycetts Grantham Cup at Belton]

Several German superstars had their first international runs of the season this weekend in the CCI3*-S at Luhmühlen. Reigning German National Champions Julia Krajewski and Samourai du Thot won on 23.9, followed closely by Badminton-bound Ingrid Klimke and SAP Hale Bob OLD. Michael Jung had an easy cruise around with Lennox 364, who is very much on the radar as his potential European Championships mount. [Luhmühlen Results]

“This sport has taught me to be thankful for the little things and take nothing for granted.” The USEA’s Now On Course series profiles a variety of different riders throughout the country. This week, we meet Sam Kelly and learn about her journey to balance college and compete three horses. [Now On Course: Things I Would Tell My 14-Year-Old Self]

Your Monday Video: Jonty and Art’s triumphant return at Belton!

Who Had the Lowest Heart Rate at the Carolina CCI4*-S Finish?

Lisa Marie Fergusson and Honor Me were one of four pairs who wore Hylofit heart-rate monitors on the Carolina CCI4*-S cross country course. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Four horses and riders wore Hylofit heart-rate monitors during cross country in the CCI4*-S at the Cloud 11 ~ Gavilan North Carolina International, and their heart rates, distance and speed were shown in real-time on the EQSportsNet live stream.

Carolina marked the first time Hylofit was used during a competition, and Kate Motley, co-founder of the company, said she hopes using the technology at events will become a regular occurrence.

“The more people ride, the more we can aggregate data and start to provide comparative analytics for riders to track course results and understand their own performance as it compares to the larger field,” she said.

Normal resting heart rate for humans is between 60 to 100 beats per minute (bpm). For horses, resting heart rate usually ranges between 32 to 36 bpm. Once a horse’s heart rate reaches 175 to 180 bpm, or 80% of his maximum heart rate, his lactic acid levels spike sharply. If you’ve been following along with EN’s articles about training with heart rate, you know lactic acid creates fatigue.

Doug Payne, Clayton Fredericks and Lisa Marie Fergusson all wore Hylofit heart-rate monitors at Carolina. You can watch the footage below.

Let’s take a look at the data at the same points on Ian Stark’s CCI4*-S cross country course — jumping over fence 7C at the influential coffin combination and at fence 21, the last jump.

Doug had two rides in the CCI4*-S and set out first with Quantum Leap, a 7-year-old RPSI gelding (Quite Capitol X Report to Sloopy xx, by Corporate Report xx) he owns with Susan Drillock. Quantum Leap only just stepped up to the Advanced level at Pine Top last month and made his CCI4*-S debut at Carolina, adding 3.2 time penalties to finish 20th.

Doug’s heart rate at the coffin was 161 bpm, with Quantum Leap’s at 196 bpm.

After traveling a further 1 1/2 miles to the finish, Doug and Quantum Leap’s heart rates both rose a further 20 bpm.

Let’s compare that to Doug’s seasoned five-star partner Vandiver, a 14-year-old Trakehner (Windfall II X Visions of Grandeur, by Mystic Replica xx) owned by Debi Crowley. Doug and Vandiver won Carolina last year as the only pair to make the optimum time. With this run serving as the horse’s final prep for the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event, these two set out of the start box on a mission.

Since Doug set out with the goal of catching the time, do you think that means we could expect his heart rate to be higher than it was while riding Quantum Leap?

It was! Doug’s heart rate was 168 bpm at the coffin, 7 bpm higher than it was with Quantum Leap. (If you compare the speeds between the two horses, Vandiver also went through the combination at a faster pace.)

At the end of the course, both Doug and Vandiver’s heart rates both rose by about 20 bpm, with Doug’s heart rate at 4 bpm higher than it was with Quantum Leap at the finish. Vandiver finished 4 seconds inside the time for fourth place — mission accomplished and on to Kentucky. (Click here if you missed the Kentucky entry list.)

Next up, let’s look at Lisa Marie Fergusson and her own Honor Me, a 13-year-old Welsh Sport Horse gelding (Brynarian Brenin X Dream Contessa xx, by Royal Chocolate xx) who represented Canada at the 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games. These two are well known as a speedy cross country duo and are also aiming for Kentucky, so they set out of the start box to beat the clock.

Honor Me had a higher rate rate at the coffin than Doug’s horses — over 10 bpm higher — but Lisa Marie’s heart rate was just 121 bpm — over 60 bpm lower than Doug’s.

By the end of the course, Tali’s heart rate rose by 11 bpm to be on par with the 220-bpm range we saw with Doug’s horses. But instead of rising 20 bpm like we saw with Doug, Lisa Marie’s heart rate actually dropped a further 3 bpm by the end of the course to just 117 bpm. Lisa finished 5 seconds inside the time for 16th place — talk about being cool under pressure!

Next up, let’s look at Clayton Fredericks and Luksor, a 17-year-old Polish gelding (Efez X Lektura, by Farnik) owned by Lily and Mary Beth Geelan. Luksor stepped up to the Advanced level last year with Lily before she went off to college, and Clayton has had the ride since last fall. The horse averaged 13.6 time penalties in his previous two runs at CCI4*-S level, and Clayton set out of the start box with a steady clear in mind.

Clayton’s heart rate at the coffin was 120 bpm, 1 bpm lower that Lisa Marie at the same point on course. Luksor’s heart rate of 198 bpm was the second lowest of the four horses — just 2 bpm higher than Quantum Leap’s.

Like Lisa Marie, Clayton’s heart rate also dropped throughout the course, falling a further 3 bpm by the final fence to match her at 117 bpm — but keep in mind that Lisa Marie was going for time and Clayton wasn’t. Luksor’s heart rate rose 23 bpm by the end of the course to 221 bpm. Clayton added 3.2 time penalties for 15th place.

Interestingly, while Clayton tied with Lisa Marie for the lowest heart rate at the finish of cross country, his heart rate spiked to nearly 180 bpm in dressage. You can watch his test with Luksor here.

You can watch more of the footage showing the Hylofit heart-rate monitor in action at Carolina on Hylofit’s YouTube Channel. Notice the difference in heart rate across the three disciplines — riders seem to be working much harder in dressage.

If you think studying heart rate is fascinating, you can track your own fitness journey with your horse this season using Hylofit — it’s like Fitbit for your horse and so easy to use. Here’s a full guide on how to get started. Go Eventing.

[Watch More Videos from Carolina International]

Kentucky CCI5*-L Entry List Goes Live with 52 Combinations

Last year’s winners Oliver Townend and Cooley Master Class are returned to defend their title. Photo by Leslie Threlkeld.

It’s the moment we’ve all been waiting for — the entry list for the 2019 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event, presented by MARS Equestrian, has officially gone live! Entries closed on Tuesday, March 26, and all combinations that entered are not currently reflected on this list, but we still have a solid first look.

Last year’s winners, Oliver Townend and Cooley Master Class, will return to defend their title. Piggy French and Quarrycrest Echo, 2018 World Equestrian Games team gold medalists for Great Britain, will also cross the pond.

Last year’s Burghley winner, Tim Price, will look to keep his Rolex Grand Slam hopes alive with Xavier Faer. Two-time Adelaide CCI5*-L winners Hazel Shannon and Willingapark Clifford will lead the charge for Australia. Brazil’s Marcelo Tosi and Glenfly round out the international contingent thus far.

We also have five five-star first-timers entered in Dom Schramm and Bolytair B, Frankie Thieriot Stutes and Chatwin, Ariel Grald and Leamore Master Plan, Matt Flynn and Wizzerd, and Chris Talley and Unmarked Bills.

Phillip Dutton, the last American rider to win Kentucky in 2008, will return with his 2018 U.S. WEG team mount, Z. Boyd Martin will also ride his 2018 U.S. WEG team mount, Tsetserleg, along with Long Island T and Ray Price.

Caroline Martin has three horses entered in Danger Mouse, The Apprentice and Islandwood Captain Jack. Lauren Kieffer also has three entries in her 2018 WEG individual partner, VermiculusLandmark’s Monte Carlo; and Paramount Importance.

Buck Davidson has four horses entered but will have to choose three from Carlevo, Copper Beach, Jak My Style and Park Trader.

Click here to view the current entry list. Please note this is not the full entry list, so keep checking back to EN for updates.

Wednesday Videos from Kentucky Performance Products: Carolina Helmet Cams

Why watch one helmet cam from Carolina International when you can watch three? Take a ride around all three of Ian Stark’s international cross country courses with Doug Payne and Vandiver in the CCI4*-S, Doug Payne and Cascor in the CCI3*-S, and Elisa Wallace and Sharp Decision in the CCI2*-S. Enjoy!

Click here to catch up on all of EN’s coverage of Carolina International. Go Eventing.

[Carolina International Final Scores]

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Not sure which horse supplement best meets your horse’s needs? Kentucky Performance Products, LLC is here to help. Call 859-873-2974 or visit KPPusa.com.

Ian Stark Hired as Course Designer for Proposed CCI5*-L at Fair Hill

From left: Tim Gardner, Fair Hill International board member; Ian Stark; and Jay Griswold, Fair Hill Foundation board member. Photo courtesy of Fair Hill.

Fair Hill International and the Fair Hill Foundation announced today that Ian Stark has been hired to design the new cross country course in preparation for hosting a CCI5*-L event in 2020.

Fair Hill confirmed to EN that Ian will also design the CCI3*-L course at the venue starting in 2020, and a CCI4*-L will not run in 2020 due to the planned addition of the CCI5*L. Derek di Grazia is still the designer for the CCI4*-L and CCI3*-L courses for the 2019 event, which will be held Oct. 16-20.

Ian visited the venue in Elkton, Maryland earlier this week for an initial survey. “I am thrilled and excited to be involved in America’s new five-star event at Fair Hill and can’t wait to get started planning the cross country course,” Ian said. “This is every designer’s dream.”

Fair Hill will be Ian’s first CCI5-L* track. A highly decorated medalist for Great Britain, Ian designs at U.S. events including Carolina International, Rebecca Farm and Woodside, as well as at top venues in the UK and Ireland, including Bramham, Tattersalls and Chatsworth. He also designed the 2015 FEI European Championships track at Blair Castle.

Fair Hill has begun a series of upgrades to the facility to make it suitable for hosting five-star events. Trish Gilbert, president of Fair Hill International Inc., said they are delighted to welcome Ian on board.

“His global reputation and experience will be invaluable to the five-star competition,” Trish said. “We all look forward to working with him as we bring this event to fruition.”

This report has been updated with additional information about the CCI4*-L and CCI3*-L at Fair Hill.

20 Countries Expressing Interest to Host 2022 FEI World Championships

Photo by Eric Swinebroad

A total of 20 countries from Europe, North America, South America and Asia have submitted expressions of interest to host the 2022 FEI World Championships, the FEI confirmed today.

Despite having two previous bidding rounds for the 2022 FEI World Equestrian Games, no realistic bids were received. As a result, the FEI Board voted unanimously last November to open a bidding process for individual world championships in all disciplines for 2022, with preference being given to multi-discipline bids. Bids to host the full seven-discipline WEG are also still being considered.

Representatives from more than 30 different venues around the world attended a workshop for potential host cities in Lausanne, Switzerland today. Participants at this inaugural interactive workshop were briefed on the benefits of hosting the championships, including the economic impact on the host city and country; operational requirements; commercial opportunities; broadcast media rights and event promotion; support from the FEI’s team of experts across key functional areas; and the bidding process.

“It is extremely encouraging to have received so many expressions of interest to host the FEI world championships 2022 and to have had the opportunity to welcome potential bidders to Lausanne for today’s workshop,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said. “We hope that this new collaborative approach, in line with the IOC’s New Norm and based on transparency, cost-effectiveness and sustainability, will result in solid formal bids, but the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

“Our sport has grown so much that an all-discipline FEI World Equestrian Games has become too big for many venues to host. By opening up the bidding process for 2022 to single and multi-discipline bids, and not excluding a full Games, we believe that we have created a more enticing formula and the high level of expressions of interest suggests that we are on the right track.”

The interested countries now have until June 7 to submit formal bids to host the 2022 FEI World Championships. A shortlist of candidates will be formed by the end of June, with a draft host agreement provided to each of the shortlisted candidates. Host agreements signed by both the candidate and relevant National Federation are due mid-September, and countries may be asked to present their bids to the FEI Evaluation Commission over the following month.

Final evaluation of all shortlisted bids will be completed by the end of October, with allocation taking place at the FEI Board meeting in Moscow, Russia during the FEI General Assembly on Nov. 16-19. 

[Strong Interest in Hosting FEI World Championships 2022]

Bromont Announces Competition Grant Program for Under-25 Riders

The beautiful Bromont sign. Photo via EN Archives.

The 2019 MARS Equestrian Bromont Three-Day Event is launching the Bromont Rising Program to provide up to 10 grants of CA$3,000 to under-25 U.S. and Canadian riders competing at the June 6-9 event in Quebec, Canada. Grant recipients can compete in any division: CCI4*-L, CCI3*-L, CCI3*-S or CCI2*-L.

In addition to the grant, the program will consist of two days of mounted and unmounted instruction prior to the start of the event from leading coaches, course designers, riders, owners and support staff, as well as coaching as requested during the event. The program will include seminars on horse selection, conformation, syndication, business skills, stable management and event preparation.

Launching a program to support young North American riders has long been a goal for Sue Ockendon, who has run Bromont since its inaugural season as the equestrian venue for the 1976 Olympic Games.

“This has long been a dream of mine, and I am delighted to have it come to fruition with the help of the 2019 Organizing Committee and our title sponsor MARS Equestrian,” Sue said. “It is so important that we recognize and provide support to our younger riders who will be the future of the sport. I am hopeful that this program will flourish and extend to other venues.”

The grant money will be awarded in a lump sum to each recipient to offset the cost of transportation, entries, lodging and meals during the June event. Program participants will arrive Monday, June 3 for the two-day training camp.

“We are trying to give a leg up to the riders who have committed to making this sport their livelihood and who need help in achieving that goal,” Sue said. “With this program, we are aiming to provide an opportunity to riders who are not currently part of any grant or training program to come to Bromont and compete with the ‘big guns.’”

The application form and selection criteria for the Bromont Rising Program will be available on the Bromont website by April 1. Selection criteria “will focus primarily on talent and determination.” Click here to view the Omnibus for the event.

Do you know of a U.S. or Canadian rider who would be a perfect fit for the Bromont Rising Program? Please share and spread the word. Go Eventing.

[MARS Equestrian Bromont Three-Day Event]

Erik Duvander’s Team Wins North American Futures Team Challenge at Carolina

Erik Duvander’s team, clockwise from top left: Sydney Conley Elliott and QC Diamantaire, Hallie Coon and Celien, Ariel Grald and Leamore Master Plan, and Caroline Martin and Danger Mouse. Photos by USEA/Leslie Mintz.

The first USEF/USET Foundation North American Futures Team Challenge took place at the Cloud 11~Gavilan North LLC Carolina International in Raeford, North Carolina, with Erik Duvander’s team taking the win.

Established with the USET Foundation and administered by USEF, the North American Futures Team Challenge is designed to complement the Eventing High Performance Program, which recently rolled out the new U.S. Eventing Pathway Program. Two teams of four combinations, one coached by U.S. Eventing Director of High Performance Erik Duvander and one coached by USEF Eventing Emerging Athlete Coach Leslie Law, will participate in training and contest an unofficial simulated team competition at select events during the season.

At Carolina International, Erik Duvander’s team completed all four of their riders with clear cross country rounds, adding just 2.0 penalties to their winning team score of 98.2. Sydney Conley Elliott and Carol Stephens’ QC Diamantaire, the only pair on the team competing in the CCI3*-S, completed on their dressage score of 29.0 to finish third.

Hallie Coon and Helen Coon’s Celien also clinched a podium finish in the CCI4*-S, competing on their dressage score of 32.3 for third place. Caroline Martin and Sherrie Martin’s Danger Mouse added 0.40 show jumping time penalties and 2.0 cross country penalties to finish ninth on 36.9. Ariel Grald and Annie Eldridge’s Leamore Master Plan added one show jumping rail to their dressage score to finish 13th on 41.2.

“Winning is obviously important because we tried to make it feel like a real competition, but in the end I am more pleased about how the whole thing rolled out,” Erik Duvander said.

“U.S. eventing athletes lack opportunities to ride as a team compared to most competitive countries within our sport. We hope this part of the program will, over the years, give our athletes a higher level of preparation before being selected for championships. This is only one aspect of areas of needed improvement, but I am pleased we are now ticking this box in a less expensive way compared to sending combinations to Europe for their first team experience.”

Erik and Leslie held debriefs with each other during each evening of the competition at Carolina, and they also spoke to the riders about their own experiences of competing on teams for Sweden and Great Britain, respectively.

“To fully replicate a championship is hard to do, but the athletes will have a greater understanding after this experience of the difference between riding as a team member and riding as an individual,” Erik said. “Riding for a team carries different expectations of the athletes, and we believe this team environment should be practiced for better team performances in the future.”

Leslie Law’s team, clockwise from top left: Alex Baugh and Mr. Candyman, Ellie O’Neal and Zick Zack, Cosby Green and Highly Suspicious, and Chris Talley and Sandro’s Star. Photos by USEA/Leslie Mintz.

Leslie Law’s team led after dressage, and Erik Duvander’s team sneaking ahead in show jumping thanks to three of four team riders jumping clear rounds. An 8.0-penalty margin separated the teams going into cross country, but Leslie’s team ultimately had to carry a score with jumping penalties to complete on 130.5.

Alex Baugh and Altorac Farm’s Mr. Candyman led the way for Leslie’s team, completing on their dressage score of 32.7 for eighth place in the CCI3*-S. Ellie O’Neal and Sally Cox’s Zick Zack had two rails down and added 0.8 cross country time penalties to finish 13th on 38.8. Cosby Green and Edie and Clay Green’s Highly Suspicious had one rail down and added 20 jumping penalties on cross country at fence 4, the Attwood Mounds, to complete on 59.0 for 36th place. Chris Talley retired Sandro’s Star at the fence 13, the Cloud 11 Montrose Pool Aquarium, when the stallion looked very strong.

As for what the riders thought of the experience, Hallie Coon’s team had already delivered three clear cross country rounds before she set out of the start box with Celien, but she said she still wanted to deliver a fast round to practice riding under pressure.

“It was easing us into the team atmosphere, and it was a lot of bonding and thinking about our horses, which was really useful,” Hallie said. “I think it is really valuable to have this to really get to know each other and to learn how to be in communication with your team members. It was really great to build that camaraderie with people and see the way forward.”

Ellie O’Neal was the second rider out for her team, all of whom competed in the CCI3*-S, so she was able to bring back feedback and insight about the course. “It was really educational with a lot of helpful parts, like the talks about what was expected of you as a team member, how to handle different situations, and the difference between being on a team versus competing as an individual.”

Erik said the program will continue to evolve in order to best suit the needs of the U.S. Eventing High Performance Program. “Some athletes will naturally thrive in a team environment and others may have some areas that need improvement and experience. We need to use these team experiences to identify and develop the necessary skills and get the athletes accustomed to team routines and expectations.”

The next USEF/USET Foundation North American Futures Team Challenge will take place at the Mars Incorporated Bromont CCI3*-L on June 6-9 in Bromont, Quebec.

“Carolina International is one of our very good spring events in the U.S., and they were happy to help us run this unofficial team event this year,” Erik said. “Bromont was chosen because it is run by Sue Ockendon, their event director, and she is hoping to develop a team event at Bromont for North and South American teams in the future. Plus, Bromont is also an event away from home, bringing another aspect of experience to develop future team riders.”

[Team Erik Duvander Victorious in First USEF/USET Foundation North American Futures Team Challenge]

Jennie Brannigan Recovering from Broken Jaw Sustained in Carolina Fall

Jennie Brannigan and FE Lifestyle at Carolina 2017. Photo by Leslie Threlkeld.

Jennie Brannigan is recovering from a broken jaw after falling from FE Lifestyle on the CCI4*-S cross country course on Saturday, March 23, at Carolina International in Raeford, North Carolina.

FE Lifestyle, a 9-year-old German Sport Horse gelding owned by Tim and Nina Gardner, left a leg jumping into the coffin at Fence 7A on Ian Stark’s course, and Jennie fell into the ditch. The horse was uninjured in the incident.

She had surgery yesterday at UNC Medical Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, to repair her broken jaw. Her doctors are planning for her to return home to Pennsylvania later this week.

Jennie extended her thanks to all who have reached out with well wishes. The EN team sends her all the best for a speedy recovery.

Click here to read all of EN’s coverage from Carolina International.

Monday News & Notes from Fleeceworks

Buck Davidson and Carlevo at Aachen 2018. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Buck Davidson and Carlevo LLC’s Carlevo quietly returned to competing this spring after a minor injury sidelined his fall campaign to compete at the Blenheim Palace CCI4*-L. Carlevo completed his first Advanced event since Aachen last month at Rocking Horse with a second-place finish, and yesterday he went one better to win the Advanced at Carolina International on 38.3, the only sub-40 finishing score in the division. Welcome back, Carlevo!

National Holiday: National Tolkien Reading Day (and all of The Lord of the Rings fans rejoiced!)

Carolina International CCI & HT: WebsiteFinal ScoresEN’s CoverageLive Stream ReplayEN’s TwitterEN’s Instagram

U.S. Weekend Action:

MDHT March Starter Trial [Final Scores]

Poplar Place March Horse Trials [Final Scores]

Full Gallop March Schooling Show II [Final Scores]

Southern Arizona Eventing Association HT [Final Scores]

Your Monday News & Notes:

While we are anxiously awaiting the entry list for the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event, we can confirm that Australia’s Hazel Shannon and Willingapark Clifford will be competing. Hazel and Clifford are two-time winners of Adelaide CCI5*-L and have never competed outside of Australia. We look forward to showing them Kentucky hospitality! [Hazel Heading to Kentucky]

We are keeping a close eye on the FEI Sports Forum, which will take place April 15-16 at FEI Headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland. Topics slated to be discussed include gender equality; an update on the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, including climate mitigation planning; eventing risk management sanctions and measures; and an all-day forum on the future of endurance. [FEI Sports Forum 2019]

Many U.S. eventing fans will know the story of Lendon Gray and her Connemara/Thoroughbred Seldom Seen. If you aren’t familiar with the tale of how the “average-moving horse everyone said was too small” launched Lendon’s career in pure dressage, this piece is absolutely worth the read. [Lendon Gray: I Made My Career On An Average-Moving Horse Everyone Said Was Too Small]

Equitana, the world’s largest equestrian trade fair and exhibition, is coming to the U.S. for the first time in autumn 2020 at the Kentucky Horse Park. Taking place over three full days, Equitana USA will offer shopping, instruction, education, entertainment and more. [Equitana to Make US Debut in 2020]

Monday Video: Holly Payne Caravella and CharmKing LLC’s CharmKing jumped a lovely clear show jumping round in the Carolina CCI3*-S to take the lead following the second phase. They ultimately finished sixth after cross country.

Social Media Roundup: Best of Cloud 11 ~ Gavilan North Carolina International

That’s a wrap on the Cloud 11 ~ Gavilan North Carolina International. Now in its sixth year at the Carolina Horse Park in Raeford, North Carolina, the event has absolutely gone from strength to strength thanks to a dedicated team who are committed to running one of the best events in the country.

We had absolutely picture-perfect weather for cross country day yesterday, and spectators and competitors alike enjoyed the beautiful sunshine. Scroll down to see the event through their eyes.

Thank you to all who followed along with EN’s coverage of Carolina International. Click here to catch up on all of our reports. Go Eventing.

Carolina International: WebsiteLive ScoresEN’s CoverageLive StreamEN’s TwitterEN’s Instagram

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Absolutely fabulous day 3 at Carolina International!!! Lucia and Clark started the day off with an awesome XC! This is both of their first run back at the Intermediate level since Lucia got pregnant a little less than 2 years ago and they both were amazing!!! Chloe then was a beast around the CCI3-S track! She jumped a little over exuberantly into the second water and I nearly went swimming, but managed to cling on! She has impressed me so much this weekend 💕 Dawson finished the day with a super double clear show jump round! One more day of competition tomorrow with Dawson running XC in the morning and Clark show jumping in the afternoon! Huge thank you to @skceventer for being an amazing groom this weekend and always ❤️ #eventing #carolinainternational #guardianhorseproducts @eqyss @equinecomfortproducts @triplecrownfeed @stubbenna @revitavetofficial

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Sunday Videos: Watch Liz Halliday-Sharp’s Winning Carolina CCI4*-S Rides

Liz Halliday-Sharp and Deborah Halliday’s Fernhill By Night led the Carolina International CCI4*-S from start to finish and won on their dressage score of 27.9, the lowest finishing score since the event started in 2014, according to EquiRatings.

EQSportsNet posted videos of Liz’s winning dressage test and clear show jumping round. Scroll down to watch those videos, and we will update this post with her cross country round once it’s available.

All live stream footage is now available to watch on demand. The USEA partnered with EQSportsNet to offer a 50% discount on subscriptions through the end of the year. Use the code EQUSEA2019 to receive a Silver Access subscription for $5 per month, which allows you to watch the on-demand footage.

Carolina International: WebsiteLive ScoresEN’s CoverageLive StreamEN’s TwitterEN’s Instagram

Hometown Heroes: Faudree and McConnon Take Carolina CCI-S Wins

Will Faudree and Caeleste. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Will Faudree and Liz Halliday-Sharp both set out of the start box in the Carolina International CCI3*-S in equal third place on 28.9 following show jumping, so whomever finished closer to the optimum time would break the tie.

Liz went out right before Will aboard Pru Dawes’ Flash Cooley, a 7-year-old Irish Sport Horse (CSF MR Kroon X Castlefield Ruby) making his CCI3*-S debut, and came home 5 seconds inside the optimum time.

As Will was approaching the end of the course with Caeleste, he heard Liz’s time announced and was able to ease up just enough to finish 1 second closer to the optimum time. When overnight leaders Holly Payne Caravella and second-placed Colleen Loach both picked up time penalties as the final two on course, Will and Caeleste took the win, with Liz and Flash Cooley finishing second.

This is the second time “Mouse,” a 9-year-old Holsteiner mare (Contender X Happygolucky, by Lucky Lionell) owned by Jennifer Mosing and Sterling Silver Stables, has won the CCI3*-S at Carolina, as she also topped the leaderboard in 2016. The following year she bowed both of her front tendons.

“It’s fun to have her back. She’s been plagued with a bit of bad luck, and we thought it was career-ending, but it turned out after a year off we brought her back. Last year I ran her all year but didn’t do any long formats,” Will said. “She feels really strong, and her aim is going to be Jersey Fresh this year. If things work out, I think she’d be a strong contender for the Pan Ams.”

Liz Halliday-Sharp and Flash Cooley. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Finishing second was a special result for Liz Halliday-Sharp and her team, as the horse’s owner, Pru Dawes, was at the event to watch “Casper” seriously impress in his debut at the level. “I produced that horse from a 4-year-old, and it’s amazing that she bought him and let me keep the ride,” Liz said. “He’s a 7-year-old and literally did his first CCI2*-L in October. He’s an incredible little machine.”

Sydney Conley Elliott and Carol Stephens’ QC Diamantaire, a 9-year-old Oldenburg (Diarado X Lantana, by Sandro Hit), jumped clear and inside the time to finish third on 29.0. (They were members of Erik Duvander’s winning North American Futures Challenge team — stay tuned for more on that.)

Alyssa Phillips and her own Oskar, a 10-year-old Holsteiner (Coriando X Nicole, by Marlo), had the save of the day at the big brush corner coming out of the Cloud 11 Montrose Pool water complex and ultimately beat the clock to move up to fourth on 29.1.

Dressage leaders Kristen Bond and I’m Sew Ready, a 15-year-old KWPN (Lupicor X Jarda, Elcaro) owned by John and Kristine Norton, delivered the second fastest trip of the division to round out the top five on 29.6.

Just 10 of 54 combinations (18.5% of the field) in the CCI3*-S jumped clear rounds inside the time on Ian Stark’s track. Click here for final results.

Andrew McConnon and Bossinova. Photo by Brant Gamma Photography.

Andrew McConnon Bests CCI2*-S

Like Will Faudree, Andrew McConnon also hails from the Southern Pines area, and taking the first international win of his career aboard his own Bossinova in the CCI2*-S in front of a hometown crowd made the result that much more special.

EN readers will be familiar with “Hugo,” a 9-year-old Hanoverian gelding (Bonifatius x Dawina, by Der Lord), we featured on EN’s Got Talent last year. He added one rail to his dressage score to win on 24.3.

“He was a 7-year-old when I got him. I looked for a quite awhile during my time in England, and I got him in the last 24 hours I was there. He’s excellent in the dressage and really steady. I can trust him to go in, but this year he feels stronger and is taking me down centerline instead of me pushing him, which I think is where those extra marks came from,” Andrew said.

“On the cross country, the footing was fantastic and the course was great — the horses stormed around. Marc Donovan did an incredible jump with the show jumping course, too. I saw horses that jumped better than I’d ever seen them jump before, and the footing (from Attwood Equestrian Surfaces) is also amazing. It led to a great show jumping round for us.”

Kyle Carter and Gaillards Lancer, an 8-year-old KWPN gelding (Diarado X Urlanta, by Flemmingh) owned by Brandon and Savannah Blackstock, jumped clear to finish second on 27.5.

Hugh Wrigley and his own FE Santos, an 8-year-old Hanoverian gelding, jumped clear to round out the top three on 28.9.

Click here for final scores in the CCI2*-S.

Praise for Carolina International

Will Faudree praised Organizing Committee co-chairs Jane Murray and Bobby Costello for their dedication to running a top notch event, particularly in regards to improving the footing on cross country and widening the galloping lanes.

“It was really an effort from the Carolina Horse Park and the Organizing Committee of the Carolina International that pushed for things that aren’t always so important for spectators, but with the ground and the footing they just did an unbelievable job,” Will said.

“Jennifer Mosing is the ‘Cloud 11’ behind this event and deserves a huge shout-out. Her support of this event gives us the ability to stand up in the meetings and say ‘you have to do the footing better.’ Without Jennifer I wouldn’t be here, but really without Jennifer none of us would be at this event.”

Andrew McConnon echoed the same sentiment: “Marc Donovan’s father, Jack Donovan, was instrumental with Lefreda Williams in really starting the park. I came down in 2002 for the first time and competed in the American Eventing Championships here in 2005. To go from there to what it looks like now, they’ve really done a great job. It’s great to have the home crowd, and it adds that bit of pressure, too.”

The action at Carolina International concludes Sunday with cross country and show jumping in the National divisions. Click here to catch up on all of EN’s Carolina coverage. Go Eventing.

Carolina International: WebsiteEntry StatusRide TimesLive ScoresStart ListsEN’s CoverageLive StreamEN’s TwitterEN’s Instagram

This Girl Is On Fire: Liz Halliday-Sharp Sweeps Carolina CCI4*-S

Liz Halliday-Sharp and Fernhill By Night. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Liz Halliday-Sharp and Fernhill By Night fulfilled EN’s prophecy today at the Cloud 11 ~ Gavilan North Carolina International, beating the clock on Ian Stark’s cross country course to take the CCI4*-S win on their dressage score of 27.9 — their personal best finishing score at the level.

The win is the sixth career international victory for “Blackie,” a 16-year-old Irish Sport Horse (Radolin x Argentina XII, by Argentinus) owned by Liz’s mother, Deborah Halliday. He has now won back-to-back internationals, as he also topped the leaderboard in his last international run at the Ocala Jockey Club CCI4*-S in 2018.

The top 10 after show jumping ran in reverse order, but with three horses in the top 10, Liz’s ride times were spread throughout the division. Deniro Z, an 11-year-old KWPN (Zapatero VDL X Zonne- Trend, by French Buffet xx) owned by The Deniro Syndicate and Ocala Horse Properties, sat second after show jumping and was meant to go later in the order, but Liz requested to ride him first so she would have enough time to ride him back to stabling, as he can be very hot to lead on the ground.

Liz Halliday-Sharp and Deniro Z. Photo by Jenni Autry.

“Niro was a bit of a beast today. I was surprised he was that far under the time because I didn’t look at my watch at all. I knew the time was really tight last year, but I was also trying to prepare him for Kentucky, too. He can be a little bit keen and onwards bound because he has a giant stride, so at a few of the fences I was wanting him to back off a bit,” Liz said. “He’s class and an incredible horse. We have a great partnership. He just fights the whole way through. I couldn’t have asked for more of him, and I’m excited to take him to Kentucky.”

After “Niro” delivered a blisteringly fast round 17 seconds inside the time, Liz sealed the deal on the win very early on as the fourth rider out of the start box. She could only beat herself with Blackie, who could be 3 seconds over the time and still win. As the last horse on course, Blackie skipped around 5 seconds inside the time to win the second CCI4*-S of his career and beat the clock at the level for the first time. Niro finished on his dressage score of 29.5, which is also his personal best finishing score at the level. Liz was the only rider in the CCI4*-S to complete on sub-30 finishing scores.

“I knew I could probably make the time on Blackie if I got stuck in since I was so far under with Niro. He didn’t need to make the time (to win), but I wanted to for myself and for the horse, so I wanted to see what we could do and take a few risks,” Liz said. “He really was fantastic. The horse has really come into his own now that he knows he’s not going to get exhausted in the long formats. He comes out and fights for me now.”

The victorious HS Eventing team: Claire Tisckos, Carter McInnis, Pru Dawes, Liz Halliday-Sharp and Debbie Carpenter.

The one-two result is the culmination of a challenging month for Liz and her team, as Gemma Jelinska, her super groom and yard manager, was admitted to the hospital in Ocala due to ulcerative colitis just before Red Hills. Gemma ultimately flew home to England to receive treatment from her trusted team of doctors and has been there ever since.

Liz’s team — Carter McInnis, Pru Dawes and Claire Tisckos — had to step up to fill Gemma’s shoes, and experienced freelance groom Debbie Carpenter also flew over from England to assist at Carolina, where the HS Eventing team competed 10 horses. Liz dedicated Blackie’s win to Gemma, and the entire EN team continues to send her well wishes.

Hallie Coon and Celien. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Hallie Coon and Celien, a 12-year-old KWPN mare (Tenerife VDL X R Quicksilver, by Hamlet) owned by Helen Coon, completed 1 second inside the time to finish third on their dressage score of 32.3. Erik Duvander’s North American Futures Challenge team had already secured the victory when Hallie set out on course, but she still wanted to go for a fast round.

“I started out with the goal in mind to make time. We’d already finished the team so the pressure was off, but I wanted to get a good, quick run in for Kentucky and fitness. I set out quickly and then I protected her a bit, just to see how things are going and knowing there are bigger things this spring,” Hallie said. “I thought she was really fantastic. She’s really game this year and really feeling fit. I was a little bit surprised by how forward-going she was; she’s not the biggest striding horse. I came home easing up, and she was really good — 1 second within the time — and that’s how I wanted it, so I was really pleased.”

(Stay tuned for more on the results from the inaugural competition for the USEF/USET Foundation North American Futures Team Challenge, a new program established to simulate competing in a team environment.)

Last year’s winners Doug Payne and Vandiver, a 15-year-old Trakehner (Windfall II X Visions of Grandeur, by Mystic Replica xx) owned by Debi Crowley, finished 4 seconds inside the time to take fourth place on 33.0.

Will Coleman and Off the Record, a 10-year-old Irish Sport Horse (VDL Arkansas X Drumagoland Bay, by Ard Ohio) owned by the Off the Record Syndicate, were 15 seconds inside the time to round out the top five on their dressage score of 33.4.

Will Coleman and OBOS O’Reilly. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Will Coleman also delivered the fastest round of the day with The Four Star Eventing Group’s OBOS O’Reilly, storming around 19 seconds inside the optimum time of 6 minutes, 40 seconds. While only one pair caught the optimum time in each of the last two runnings of the CCI4*-S here at Carolina, the clock proved much easier to beat today, with 11 total pairs inside.

In addition to the pairs already mentioned, the following combinations beat the clock: Felix Vogg and Colero (sixth, 33.8), Sharon White and Cooley On Show (eighth, 35.7); Ariel Grald and Leamore Master Plan (13th, 41.2); Lisa Marie Fergusson and Honor Me (16th, 42.1); and Cornelia Dorr and Sir Patico MH (18th, 43.0). Lisa Marie Fergusson and Honor Me also won EN’s Biggest Mover Award, shooting up 24 places after dressage.

The CCI4*-S cross country course saw an 83% completion rate. Click here for a full breakdown of all the action in EN’s live updates. Click here for final scores from the CCI4*-S.

Will Faudree and Caeleste. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Looking to the other divisions, Will Faudree and Caeleste, owned by Jennifer Mosing and Sterling Silver Stables, won the CCI3*-S for a second time. Liz Halliday-Sharp and Pru Dawes’ Flash Cooley finished on the same score of 28.9 in the horse’s CCI3*-S debut, but Will was 1 second closer to the optimum time to break the tie in his favor. Sydney Conley Elliott and Carol Stephens’ QC Diamantaire, who were also members of Erik Duvander’s team, finished third on 29.0.

In the CCI2*-S, Andrew McConnon and his own Bossinova dropped one rail in show jumping today but still clinched the CCI2*-S victory on 24.3 — the first international win of their career. Kyle Carter and Gaillards Lancer, owned by Brandon and Savannah Blackstock, jumped clear to finish second on 27.5. Hugh Wrigley and his own FE Santos jumped clear to round out the top three on 28.9.

Looking to the Advanced, Waylon Roberts and Lancaster, owned by Michelle and John Koppin, added 6.8 time penalties on cross country to move up to lead overnight. Buck Davidson and Carlevo LLC’s Carlevo added 10.8 time penalties to remain in second on 38.3. Matt Flynn and Flynn Sport Horses’ Wizzerd moved up to third on 40.0 with 8.0 time penalties added. Show jumping starts at 8 a.m. EST tomorrow. Click here for start lists.

Stay tuned for much more from Carolina International, including more quotes from today’s big winners. Thank you to all for following along with EN’s coverage of this fantastic event. Go Eventing.

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Girl Power at Carolina: Halliday-Sharp Dominating CCI4*-S + Much More

Liz Halliday-Sharp and Fernhill By Night. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Liz Halliday-Sharp is dominating the CCI4*-S at Carolina International, holding the lead on 27.9 after show jumping with Fernhill By Night and moving up to second on 29.5 with Deniro Z thanks to delivering clear rounds with both horses.

Marc Donovan’s course always shakes up the leaderboard at Carolina, and 17 of the 43 pairs in the CCI4*-S jumped clear rounds inside the time to give us a 40% clear rate. Last year’s winners Doug Payne and Vandiver dropped one rail to slip from second place after dressage to fifth.

“Now I’ve been here enough that I know you have to keep moving no matter what,” Liz said of Marc’s show jumping track. “I had some help from Richard Picken in warm-up and he really knows those horses now, so he got it just right.”

After having two rails down at Millstreet last year, Liz went on a 1.30-meter show jumping crusade with Deniro Z, an 11-year-old KWPN gelding (Zapatero VDL X Zonne- Trend, by French Buffet xx) owned by The Deniro Syndicate and Ocala Horse Properties.

Liz Halliday-Sharp and Deniro Z. Photo by Jenni Autry.

“Each track we did, he got better and I got better. I think that helped me figure out how to ride him a bit more. He’s looking for the rider to do quite a bit — he’s not a light, fluffy ride,” Liz said. “He’s also a lot stronger now, especially behind, so now I can really get him into the base of the jump.”

Liz also has her third ride, The Monster Partnership’s Cooley Quicksilver, sitting inside the top 10 in his CCI4*-S debut after he jumped a clear round today.

Looking ahead to tomorrow’s cross country, Liz can afford to be 10 seconds over the optimum time of 6 minutes, 40 seconds and still take the win with “Blackie,” a 16-year-old Irish Sport Horse (Radolin x Argentina XII, by Argentinus) owned by Deborah Halliday.

“Blackie isn’t the world’s fastest horse, but he is quick enough. I need to be super efficient with him,” Liz said. “I definitely think early on this course you have to come out of the box in sixth gear because that’s one place where it’s flat so you can get a bit of speed up.”

Hallie Coon and Celien. Photo by Brant Gamma Photography.

Hallie Coon and Celien, a 12-year-old KWPN mare (Tenerife VDL X R Quicksilver, by Hamlet) owned by Helen Coon, will be looking to capitalize on cross country tomorrow after their clear round moved them up to third place on 32.3.

“She’s been jumping out of her skin this year. We’ve been approaching show jumping with a different view and mixing it up for her. It’s my job to get her there with a bit of a gap to the fences, and it’s her job to do the rest,” Hallie said. “Mostly it’s about getting her to the fences with not a lot of momentum and getting her there with a gap so she actually has to use her scope and try.”

The general consensus from the riders is that Ian Stark’s CCI4*-S cross country course is a bit softer this year (though it is wise to never underestimate Ian!), and Hallie said she thinks it will be a good prep run for Celien as she aims for the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event.

“There are good questions that will prepare the horses for Kentucky. The main factor here is always time, but I think this year it might be a little easier to get because they’ve done so much work on the ground and a lot of clearing out there. The galloping lanes are so much wider, and it’s easier to see where you’re going.”

Hallie and Celien are competing on Erik Duvander’s team as part of the USEF/USET Foundation North American Futures Team Challenge, a new program established to simulate competing in a team environment. Stay tuned for much more on the North American Futures Team Challenge.

Click here for full scores in the CCI4*-S after show jumping.

Holly Payne Caravella and CharmKing. Photo by Jenni Autry.

CharmKing Jumps to CCI3*-S Lead

Holly Payne Caravella and CharmKing, an 8-year-old Holsteiner (Cassito X O-Heraldika, by Heraldik) owned by CharmKing LLC, moved up to lead the CCI3*-S after dressage leaders Kristen Bond and I’m Sew Ready dropped one rail.

“I’m just really proud of him this weekend because he had just started to get to the point where he’s getting a little fitter and a little more worked up in the big atmosphere,” Holly said. “He knows what it’s about now, which kind of worries you when they get a little too excited about it, but he was good and rideable in the dressage and was the same in the show jumping today. He definitely felt the atmosphere, but it just made him jump better.”

As for Holly’s thoughts on Ian’s CCI3*-S course: “I think there’s plenty to do out there, but it’s very fair and it’s a good benchmark of where you are in your training. I think if you have an issue, then that’s a hole in your education that you can go home and work on. Then if you do well, you’re right on track with your education.”

Colleen Loach and FE Golden Eye, a 7-year-old Hanoverian gelding (Goldfever X Cascade, by Contendro I) she owns with Amanda Bernhard, jumped clear to move up to second on 27.0 in the horse’s CCI3*-S debut.

Will Faudree and Caeleste, a 9-year-old Holsteiner mare owned by Jennifer Mosing and Sterling Silver Stables, and Liz Halliday-Sharp and Pru Dawes’ Flash Cooley, a 7-year-old Irish Sport Horse (CSF MR Kroon X Castlefield Ruby) making his CCI2*-S debut, both jumped clear to move up to equal third on 28.9.

A total of 25 pairs jumped clear rounds inside the time on Marc Donovan’s CCI3*-S show jumping course to give us a 45% clear rate. Click here to view full scores after show jumping.

Andrew McConnon and Bossinova. Photo by Brant Gamma Photography.

Andrew McConnon Holds Lead in CCI2*-S

It’s been a busy day at Carolina International, with cross country also taking place for the CCI2*-S. Andrew McConnon and his own Bossinova, a 9-year-old Hanoverian gelding (Bonifatius x Dawina, by Der Lord), finished 5 seconds inside the optimum time of 5 minutes, 58 seconds to hold their lead on 20.3.

“I had to go pretty quick to go inside the time,” Andrew said. “The footing was fantastic and the course was presented beautifully, which allowed for the horses to really gallop. It was a great galloping track.”

Andrew and “Hugo” have a rail and time in hand for tomorrow’s show jumping, and he said he’s feeling confident as he aims to secure the first international win of his career. “He’s beautifully behaved, so I just need to ask the right questions of him.”

Waylon Roberts and Michelle Koppin’s Fortunate Rebel, a 9-year-old Irish Sport Horse, also caught the time on cross country to remain on their dressage score of 27.4 and move up to second place.

Kyle Carter and Gaillards Lancer, an 8-year-old KWPN gelding (Diarado X Urlanta, by Flemmingh) owned by Brandon and Savannah Blackstock, also jumped clear and inside the time to move up to third place on 27.5.

Ian Stark’s track definitely shook up the leaderboard, with 22 of the 62 combinations jumping clear rounds inside the time (35% of the field). Click here to view scores after cross country.

Allison Springer and Business Ben Best Advanced

Dressage also kicked off today for the National divisions, and Allison Springer and Business Ben lead the Advanced on 27.2, a personal best at the level. Allison has carefully produced Ben, a 9-year-old unraced Thoroughbred (Artie Schiller X Min Elreeh, by Danzig) owned by The Business Ben Partnership, through the levels with the future in mind. He stepped up to the Advanced level last year, and Allison said he has come out this season a more mature horse.

“He was excited in the cold wind this morning, but he’s really learning to channel that energy,” Allison said. “All of his excitement comes from a place of wanting to do the right thing and loving the job. You can’t beat that in the Thoroughbred mind.”

Allison has yet to push the clock on cross country since Ben stepped up to Advanced, and she said tomorrow she will look to give him a solid, educational round to build on later in the spring season.

“I can’t say I’m going for the time tomorrow, but I’m producing him to be more rideable,” she said. “It’s about waiting for them to mature and totally get it.”

Buck Davidson and Carlevo LLC’s Carlevo, a 12-year-old Holsteiner (Caresino X Ramatuelle, by Levernois), scored 27.5 for second place — meaning Allison doesn’t have even 1 second in hand on cross country tomorrow.

Alexa Lapp and Cambalda, a 17-year-old Irish Sport Horse gelding (Balda Beau X Cathy’s Lady), scored 29.5 for third place. Alexa and “Ping” competed in the Advanced combined test at Rocking Horse several weeks ago and are contesting their first Advanced here at Carolina.

Click here to view full scores across all divisions.

CCI3*-S cross country will stream live tomorrow on EQTV Network from 10-11:54 a.m. EST, followed by CCI4*S cross country from 12:30-2:48 p.m. EST and Advanced cross country from 3-4:15 p.m. EST. Click here for a fence-by-fence preview of the CCI4*-S course.

Thank you to all the amazing volunteers who make Carolina such a fabulous event, and thank you for following along with EN’s coverage. Go Eventing.

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Carolina International CCI4*-S Cross Country Course Preview

Fence 4ABC – The Attwood Mounds. Photo by Jenni Autry.

The Cloud 11 ~ Gavilan North Carolina International is always one of the most highly anticipated events of the U.S. spring season, and Ian Stark’s cross country course never disappoints. Time is extremely difficult to catch in the CCI4*-S, with only one pair managing it in each of the last two runnings of the event. Caroline Martin and The Apprentice beat the clock when they won in 2017, as did Doug Payne and Vandiver when they won last year.

The CCI4*-S course follows much of the same route as last year and is beautifully decorated by Janine McClain and her top notch team. The first three fences — Knowlbrook Farms Welcome to Carolina International at fence 1, The Kingfisher Park Guard House at fence 2, and CDP Stables Home of the Brave at fence 3 — settle horses and riders into a rhythm before the first combination at fence 4, The Attwood Mounds. Riders will tackle an angled hanging log at A before jumping a narrow log at B and a triple brush at C.

Fence 5, The Spindletop Farm Hurdles, is a combination of two rolltops. Then it’s on to fence 6, The Winter Book Farm Kennel, before the coffin at fence 7. Called the Breezeway and Friendship Complex, the coffin has a hanging log as the A element, one stride to the ditch and then out over a triple brush. Fence 8, the The Osphos Table, is a beautiful new table built by course builders Tyson Rementer and Levi Ryckewart.

Fence 13ABC – Cloud 11 Montrose Pool Aquarium. Photo by Jenni Autry.

Fence 9, Horsepower Technologies’ Roll Tops, is a turning question with two narrow rolltops. The cabin at fence 10, DGS Group of Southeby’s 10 International Realty Cabin, bring riders to the next combination at fence 11, Cordelia’s White Gates, which features two white gates on an uphill approach. Then it’s on the imposing Hylofit Ditch and Brush at fence 12 before the first water complex at Cloud 11 Montrose Pool Aquarium. Riders drop in over a log at A, jump a wedge in the water as B, then kick up the hill to the trakehner at C, and finally on to the open oxer at D, which was separately numbered last year.

Fence 14 is a beautifully carved narrow fence called Seminole Feed Farmyard, and leads to the next combination at fence 15, Setters’ Run. Riders will jump an open oxer as the A element, followed by a narrow brush at B. The next three fences, The MLB table at fence 16, The Pyne Family Trakehner at fence 17, and the The Emerald Valley Cordwood pile at fence 18, lead to the next water complex.

Fence 19AB – The Lumbee River Chincoteague Pegasus. Photo by Jenni Autry.

The new brush built for the The Lumbee River Chincoteague Pegasus water complex at fence 19 is quite a site to behold. The direct route takes horses and riders over the brush and into the water as the AB element, then a left-hand turn out of the water and up to a narrow hanging log as the C element. Fence 20, The Land Rover Tobacco Barn Complex, features the same open corner combination as last year, and then it’s on to the last at fence 21, Southeast Farm Finale.

The CCI4*-S is 3,800 meters with an optimum time of 6 minutes, 40 seconds. CCI3*-S cross country will stream live tomorrow, March 23, on EQTV Network from 10-11:54 a.m. EST, followed by CCI4*S cross country from 12:30-2:48 p.m. EST and Advanced cross country from 3-4:15 p.m. EST. You can view maps of all the courses here, and scroll down for a fence-by-fence preview of the CCI4*-S course. Go Eventing.

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